Hockey’s Greatest Photos

 

©Bruce Bennett

©Bruce Bennett

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

©Bruce Bennett

©Bruce Bennett

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To all the ships at sea,

Honesty is the best policy.  Most photographers can range from good, to mediocre, to fine, to great, to super.  Regardless of whether they’re an amateur, a pro, an advanced whatever, they all seem to have one thing in common, they aren’t good businessmen.  Neil Leifer, Jay Mizell, Pete Turner, great photographers, great businessmen.  Which leads me to a book with a very modest name, Hockey’s Greatest Photos, by Bruce Bennett.  Before seeing the book, and just hearing the name, I think I said four wow’s.  The book arrived on my doorstep today, and you know what, they may not be all the greatest hockey photos, but there’s a whole lot of great photos in this book.  If you’re a hockey aficionado, if you’re a hockey player, if you’re from Canada, Boston New York, anywhere theres an NHL team, you must own this book.  Bruce, are you really going to give me $2 a  book for endorsement?  That’s me trying to be funny.  If anyone knows Bruce, he’s not giving anyone any money, that’s also me trying to be funny.  Bruce, I take my beret off to you.  Are you the same Bruce Bennett that use to assist me?  Hm… I wonder…  Well, I’ll leave you with this, there’s an old Italian saying, “Mazel Tov, You’re a real mensch.”

 

                                                           The Hockey News

                   Hockey’s Greatest Photos The Bruce Bennett Collection

                             Forewords by Wayne Gretzky & Martin Brodeur

The Hockey News’ latest book, Hockey’s Greatest Photos: The Bruce Bennett Collection, is the perfect pickup for the diehard hockey fan. As the “Wayne Gretzky of hockey photography,” Bruce Bennett is known as the best in the business, and he has put together the definitive collection of the game’s best photos from his 40-plus years shooting hockey.

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then Hockey’s Greatest Photos is a 250,000-word epic. In it, Bennett reveals 250 of his best photos taken from an archive that runs to more than two million images shot over his four decades in hockey. He captures it all: competition, camaraderie, iconic moments, amazing goals, sizzling saves, bone-crushing hits, and off-ice hilarity. He covers every emotion associated with the game, from the ecstasy of victory to the agony of defeat, and he does so from every conceivable angle. Whether on the ice, from the corner, in the stands, behind the bench, beside the penalty box, inside the net or in the dressing room, Hockey’s Greatest Photos immortalizes the essence of the game.

About The Photographer:

For 40 years Bruce Bennett has covered hockey. Bruce shot his first Stanley Cup final in Philadelphia in 1976 as the Montreal Canadiens defeated the Flyers. Since then, he has covered 35 Cup finals, 26 All-Star Games, more than 375 international games including four Winter Olympics, and more than 4,500 NHL games. In addition, Bruce has been the team photographer for several Stanley Cup winning teams including the New York Islanders, New Jersey Devils, and New York Rangers. Bruce’s company Bruce Bennett Studios (BBS) and its archive of two million hockey images was acquired by Getty Images in 2004, and Bruce joined the company as a staff photographer.

About the Book:

Hockey’s Greatest Photos: The Bruce Bennett Collection

By The Hockey News

Photographs by Bruce Bennett

Forewords by Wayne Gretzky & Martin Brodeur

On-sale October 6th, 2015

The Hockey News

ISBN: 9781988002125  $39.95 CAN $34.95 US

eBook ISBN: 9781476782522 $15.99 $12.99

For media inquiries or requests for promotional images please contact Katie.callaghan@simonandschuster.ca.

www.simonandschuster.ca

 

 

 

I think I used to shoot hockey in the day…

 

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe DiMaggio

 

 

 

Ace could win Westminister, or maybe Belmont… I don’t know which one.

©Joe Di Maggio

©Joe Di Maggio

Like most photographers, when I’m feeling a little rusty, especially with my hand eye coordination (that really shouldn’t happen if your 25 years old right?), or if  just want to check out a new camera or new lens, I’ll take my best friend (my best male friend), Ace… my puppalupus.  He’s so much fun to be around, and to be honest with you, he makes one hell of a great model, especially when he makes eye contact.  I think what he’s saying is, “Joe I love you,” “Joe, if you get a hoop and set it on fire, I’ll jump through that.”  How many of our friends would do that?

To all the ships at sea, when you’re feeling a little rusty, go out and rent a puppy, steal a cat, or go to the zoo.

Have a great day.

©Joe Di Maggio

©Joe Di Maggio

 

©Joe Di Maggio

©Joe Di Maggio

Pocono Raceway Photo Workshop Saturday May 24th

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

My next upcoming Workshop is an in-depth Sports and Action Workshop at the Pocono 500 Racetrack.  This workshop is for a small elite group and is for intermediate to advanced photographers only please.  Learn the In’s and Outs of photographing auto racing.  We will have credentials and great access to the track.  We will be photographing Go Karts and later on, in-the-day, Stock Cars that will be going at high speeds. This will be a very special action packed workshop and a fun day!  For more information on the Workshop

Formula One Grand Prix Multi-media Presentation by Joe DiMaggio

Indy 500

Hi to All the Ships at Sea,

Sports Illustrated selected this as the third greatest photograph from the last 100 years. I have nothing else to say except Geoff Miller nailed the closest finish, I was proud to say he was my assistant on this shoot.

All the Best,

Joe D

You can now follow me on Twitter @dimaggio_photo
Visual Impressions with Joe DiMaggio, Sponsored by Adorama
www.adorama.com
Adorama Learning Center

Oh My God, it’s May!

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

To all the ships at sea,

If it’s May, it has to be the Indianapolis 500. This photograph was selected by Sports Illustrated as the third greatest photograph in the last 100 years of the 500. They reproduced it in the centennial issue and on their website. That’s the good news, the bad news is they never asked me. Does the word “copyright” mean anything to anyone? Who said “power to the people”? No, it’s “power to the corporation”, step on all the people. In this society, we all have to play by the same rules. Actually, I think someone wrote that in the Constitution. To my friends; go out and make some great photos. Capture history with a camera. Life is good, life is great. Health and happiness to everybody, even SI.

Shooting From the Inside Out 2

Hi to All the Sips at Sea,

While working on an essay called America, I came across some college students at the U of A who were heavy into mountain biking. We did all of the classic cliché photos and then I decided we can do better. So I took one of the small Canon cameras with a 15mm lens and a remote cord and put it at the end of a painters pole and was actually able (for a  millisecond) to get the camera under the tire as the young man did a wheely.

 

All the Best,

Joe D

You can now follow me on Twitter @dimaggio_photo
Visual Impressions with Joe DiMaggio, Sponsored by Adorama
www.adorama.com
Adorama Learning Center

Indy 500

Hi to All the Ships at Sea,

The tulips are coming up, seems like the snow is almost gone and the Indy cars are starting to run. Remember what I said, one camera, one lens, all the time. Here’s a shot from the old days with one of my assistants. Count the cameras. Thank god for assistants. Would hate to be looking at his MRI today. On a recent Formula One, which in many ways is much more difficult than the Indy 500, I used 2 cameras and 2 lenses. Two Canon 5D Mark III, one 80mm-200  f/2.8 zoom and a second 5D Mark III with grip and 400mm f/5.6 and carrying a 1.4 extender. Gitso Monopod and 6 lexar cards, 8 gigs up to 32 gigs  Simple. Keep it simple. The photograph on the bottom was named by Sports Illustrated as the third best photograph of all time of the last 100 years.

All the Best,

Joe D

You can now follow me on Twitter @dimaggio_photo                                                                                                                                                              © Joe DiMaggio
Visual Impressions with Joe DiMaggio, Sponsored by Adorama
www.adorama.com
Adorama Learning Center

Shooting From the Inside Out

Hi to All the Ships at Sea,

This photo of Arturo Gatti will be featured in my new book, “Shooting From the Inside Out”. Tentative publishing date is late September, 2013.

All the best,

Joe D

You can now follow me on Twitter @dimaggio_photo
Visual Impressions with Joe DiMaggio, Sponsored by Adorama
www.adorama.com
Adorama Learning Center

The Fire Within

Hi to All the Ships at Sea,

Keisher McLeod- Wells aka “Fire”, is one of my dear friends. She is one of the most beautiful, lovely, talented, hard-working people I know. Unfortunately, Fire has had a major tragedy in her family. What she’s done, is taken all of the responsibility and done the absolute right thing. I wish her nothing but great luck and God speed.

022213_dibroseland_58783

After friends and family, photography and filmmaking is my life. The three photos above, in my opinion, are excellent. Unfortunately I have a problem with them, I don’t know who took them, there’s no copyright on them and when my studio manager put them in Photoshop, there was no copyright on the back. Therefore, the photographs then become public domain and the photographer, and I must say a very good one, is not going to get his/her credit. All fine photographers have to work very hard at their craft and their art, I really need to know who made these photos and then that photographer needs to protect them. Sir or Madam, you did a great job. For purposes of the blog ONLY, we’ll call it ©Fire 2013.

All the best,
Joe D

You can now follow me on Twitter @dimaggio_photo
Visual Impressions with Joe DiMaggio, Sponsored by Adorama
www.adorama.com
Adorama Learning Center

Amgen Tour of California

Hi to all the Ships at Sea,

Sandy is quite the writer. With all his experience, imagine he’s only 21 years old. Remember you’re only as young as you feel. Enjoy this article he wrote below. Although my photograph is not from the Amgen Tour of California as he speaks about, it does put my mind in a place of determination.

All the best,

Joe D

Before I start writing on today’s subject, I must apologize for being absent for almost 5 weeks. I took my flu shot as I was supposed to, but I learned when they say the elderly are most susceptible, they are not lying. I’m thankful I took that shot, as it might have been more severe.
Anyway, I am back and excited to write about America’s Premier Road Race… The Amgen Tour of California.
This year, it is a story of grit, determination and desire to move forward in the face of what to others might seem as insurmountable obstacles: the sport stunned by an overwhelming scandal, major sponsors withdrawing support and the fear of public condemnation. Faced with all this, two young ladies Kristen and Kelly marched on. Their leadership and entrepreneurism may prove to bring about the greatest racing competition yet.
For the first 7 years. An estimated 17,500,000 viewers, not to mention the additional millions that have seen it on 5 continents, have viewed the race live on the roads of California, according to the Highway Patrol.
This road statistic is based on 2.5 million people standing by the roadside each and every year. The race, in its first 7 years has ridden through 91 cities, towns and villages. The 2013 race will showcase 13 more host cities for the first time.
As far as California goes, the ATOC has introduced to the world, via TV and Social Media, not only familiar vistas such as the Golden Gate Bridge, Hollywood and sensational seascapes, but it has traversed many never-before-seen mountain peaks, vineyards and historical monasteries along the vast expanse of the Golden State that beckons tourists yearly.
As a rule, the race has traveled from North (San Francisco) to South (San Diego County). This year in the interest of diversification and new geological challenges, the race will start on Sunday May 12 in Escondido and 742 miles later on May 19th will end in Santa Rosa.
The international field will consist of 13 of the world’s top teams and almost 150 riders. In stage one, they must climb Mount Palomar, an effort that is compared to the arduous Tour de France’s Alpe d’Huez .
The second stage will see the riders going from the 100 degree heat of the Desert through the San Jacinto mountains and finishing atop the Palm Springs Aerial Tramway Parking Lot… one of the toughest climbs anywhere giving the viewers a different look at the resort communities of the Coachella Valley.
Stage 3 starting in Palmdale will follow the route of the Famous Furnace Creek 508 though Santa Clarita.
Stage 4 has been part of earlier Tours. The riders will have an opportunity to enjoy cool ocean breezes after sweltering through the heat of the Desert. Like Stage 3, the Santa Clarita-Santa Barbara is a route used in the past. However, this race it is run in a reverse direction… South to North.
Stage 5 is from Santa Barbara to Avila Beach tracing the route used successful in the 2006 race, but again reversing direction. Avila is a picturesque harbor town with quaint shops and a beautiful Beach.
San Jose, the only city to take part in every edition of the ATOC, will be Stage 6. It will feature an individual time trial with a unique twist at the end… the most difficult sprint finish in the History of the Tour… the 3-kilometer climb up Metcalf Road (from Sea Level to 1000 feet in elevation attacking several pitches of at least a 10% grade.
Stage 7 starts in Livermore and concludes on the Summit of Mount Diablo. The experts predict that it is more than likely; the Tour will be won, or lost on the climb to the Peak.
Once again Stage 8 will capture the beauty of the entire San Francisco Bay Area, the final stage starts in the Marina District and concludes in picturesque Santa Rosa.
The State of California is home to over 30 million cyclists. Professional Cycling should not be damned, or abandoned because of the inconsiderate acts of a few selfish “win at all costs” individuals.
The ATOC stands as beacon for an untarnished, clean competition. Annual, the almost 800 mile event has been an example of what it is to go all out and do your best.
To paraphrase the late Grantland Rice who once wrote, “It’s not who wins, or loses, but how you play the game that counts!” The ATOC symbolizes competition you can trust and is worthy of support.