Patty, Here’s Your Baby

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

To all the ships at sea,

The first thing I gravitate to in the morning is salt water. The last thing at night I gravitate to is salt water. I love the ocean. I like being in and around the ocean and I like photographing above and below the water. Theres something about the salt water that makes me a happy camper. Living on the sea for over two decades was a great experience. With no rhyme and no reason, here are two photographs of Jill Diane in a cover shoot for her new album. I insisted that my oldest friend, Pat Nap, would accompany us as the sun came up over Jones Beach. He did. He sat on a blanket and watched the way fathers always watch their daughters. It was a beautiful thing, it was a spiritual thing, it was a lovely and great thing. The only problem is, and  I will never know why, I didn’t pick up my camera and make a photograph of my best friend Patty. Wow, I’m sorry I didn’t. So, the lesson for today is please take more photographs and don’t take anything for granted. Some day, that snapshot or photograph could be very meaningful, especially as we come up to Jill’s wedding in July.

Great shooting,

Joe D.

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

Hockey’s Greatest Photos

 

©Bruce Bennett

©Bruce Bennett

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

©Bruce Bennett

©Bruce Bennett

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To all the ships at sea,

Honesty is the best policy.  Most photographers can range from good, to mediocre, to fine, to great, to super.  Regardless of whether they’re an amateur, a pro, an advanced whatever, they all seem to have one thing in common, they aren’t good businessmen.  Neil Leifer, Jay Mizell, Pete Turner, great photographers, great businessmen.  Which leads me to a book with a very modest name, Hockey’s Greatest Photos, by Bruce Bennett.  Before seeing the book, and just hearing the name, I think I said four wow’s.  The book arrived on my doorstep today, and you know what, they may not be all the greatest hockey photos, but there’s a whole lot of great photos in this book.  If you’re a hockey aficionado, if you’re a hockey player, if you’re from Canada, Boston New York, anywhere theres an NHL team, you must own this book.  Bruce, are you really going to give me $2 a  book for endorsement?  That’s me trying to be funny.  If anyone knows Bruce, he’s not giving anyone any money, that’s also me trying to be funny.  Bruce, I take my beret off to you.  Are you the same Bruce Bennett that use to assist me?  Hm… I wonder…  Well, I’ll leave you with this, there’s an old Italian saying, “Mazel Tov, You’re a real mensch.”

 

                                                           The Hockey News

                   Hockey’s Greatest Photos The Bruce Bennett Collection

                             Forewords by Wayne Gretzky & Martin Brodeur

The Hockey News’ latest book, Hockey’s Greatest Photos: The Bruce Bennett Collection, is the perfect pickup for the diehard hockey fan. As the “Wayne Gretzky of hockey photography,” Bruce Bennett is known as the best in the business, and he has put together the definitive collection of the game’s best photos from his 40-plus years shooting hockey.

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then Hockey’s Greatest Photos is a 250,000-word epic. In it, Bennett reveals 250 of his best photos taken from an archive that runs to more than two million images shot over his four decades in hockey. He captures it all: competition, camaraderie, iconic moments, amazing goals, sizzling saves, bone-crushing hits, and off-ice hilarity. He covers every emotion associated with the game, from the ecstasy of victory to the agony of defeat, and he does so from every conceivable angle. Whether on the ice, from the corner, in the stands, behind the bench, beside the penalty box, inside the net or in the dressing room, Hockey’s Greatest Photos immortalizes the essence of the game.

About The Photographer:

For 40 years Bruce Bennett has covered hockey. Bruce shot his first Stanley Cup final in Philadelphia in 1976 as the Montreal Canadiens defeated the Flyers. Since then, he has covered 35 Cup finals, 26 All-Star Games, more than 375 international games including four Winter Olympics, and more than 4,500 NHL games. In addition, Bruce has been the team photographer for several Stanley Cup winning teams including the New York Islanders, New Jersey Devils, and New York Rangers. Bruce’s company Bruce Bennett Studios (BBS) and its archive of two million hockey images was acquired by Getty Images in 2004, and Bruce joined the company as a staff photographer.

About the Book:

Hockey’s Greatest Photos: The Bruce Bennett Collection

By The Hockey News

Photographs by Bruce Bennett

Forewords by Wayne Gretzky & Martin Brodeur

On-sale October 6th, 2015

The Hockey News

ISBN: 9781988002125  $39.95 CAN $34.95 US

eBook ISBN: 9781476782522 $15.99 $12.99

For media inquiries or requests for promotional images please contact Katie.callaghan@simonandschuster.ca.

www.simonandschuster.ca

 

 

 

I think I used to shoot hockey in the day…

 

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe DiMaggio

 

 

 

Saint Patty’s vs. Chinese New Year

To all the ships at sea,

Everybody knows about Murphy, my god, yesterday was Saint Patty’s day, Murphy was all over the place.  When you combine Murphy with a senior moment (even though I’m an adolescent immature senior), you come up with Oh my God I forgot.  I wrote a beautiful note to Terri on the quality of her photographs but forgot to post them on the blog, consider them now posted.  Terri you have my apologies.

©TerriShadle

©TerriShadle

 

©TerriShadle

©TerriShadle

 

©TerriShadle

©TerriShadle

©TerriShadle

©TerriShadle

 

©TerriShadle

©TerriShadle

 

The Greatest Things in Life are Free

_G0A5188 copy

It never ceases to amaze me the greatest things in life are free.  A little tiny pat on the back, a smile, an acknowledgment that you’re doing well.  But the advent in the digital world, many free things are forgotten.  I was pleasantly surprised when I received a visit from Peter Poremba, the CEO of Dyn-alite, his beautiful wife, and his equally beautiful, charming daughter Olivia.  I’ve know Olivia since she was born.  She’s amazingly beautiful and bright.  She made this get well card for me, which is out being framed as we speak.  Olivia, thank you so much.  Peter and Conni, you done good!  A few snaps of Olivia taken approximately seven years ago, and her puppy Harley.

 

 

 

©JoeDiMaggio

©JoeDiMaggio

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

©JoeDiMaggio

©JoeDiMaggio

©JoeDiMaggio

©JoeDiMaggio

 

 

Yukiko and Tom

©YukikoLaunois

© Tom  Sobolik & YukikoLaunois

To all the ships at sea,

Both JoAnne and I absolutely love going to any art gallery, museum, or photo show.  If you allow your mind to open up to new ideas, it can be a tremendous inspiration to your own work.  We were invited to the opening of Yukiko’s work in Westchester county at the Martin Stankiewicz gallery.  I have to tell you it was a fabulous show.  Both photographers, diametrically opposite in style, but tremendous talents.  To say nothing of the Prosecco, that was very dry, and that’s me trying to be funny.  Over my X number of decades in photography, Yukiko was probably my favorite editor, and definitely the toughest.  When Yukiko gave me an idea, or a critique, I listened, and I executed on her recommendation, and then of coarse, I did it my way, the combination was extremely successful for both of us.  Life is good.  I purchased one of her pieces that was typical Asian composition (I studied art in Japan, less is more).  Yukiko’s work is so strong and minimalistic.  If you have the opportunity, see her show, it’s worth the ride.  If not, she’s having a gallery show in Manhattan, more to follow.  I would be remise if I didn’t say that Tom is a fabulous photographer. He’s been across the block quite a bit and he’s taken his Black Star routes and added a fine art twist.  Excellent photographer.  It’s all good.

 

Artists’s Statement: Tom Sobolik

This exhibit is the result of artistic larceny.  The exhibit also grew out of the 34-year photography friendship between Yukiko Launois and me.  We met in1980 when Yukiko was head of the photo library at the Black Star photo agency and I, a fledgling photojournalist, went to work for her.  After a career as a photo editor for Black Star and Corbis, Yukiko became  a photographer herself in retirement.  My career was a photojournalist and a corporate photographer through Black Star.  About 10 years ago I began switching my emphasis to landscape photography.

I was inspired to winter scenes by Yukiko occasionally sent of snow in Central Park.  Photographing purely for her own enjoyment, she would “publish” them by home-making greeting cards and sending them to friends.  I loved the photos and was drawn to the harmony, simplicity and grace in them juxtaposed to the stark contrasts and harshness of winter.

Without knowing the Picasso quote, “Bad artists copy.  Good artists steal”, I began unconsciously pilfering the sensibilities I drew from my friends photos.  After seeing the early results I became much more aware of Yukiko’s influence on my winter work and I began unabashedly helping myself to all I could of her vision.  This show is some of the evidence of that thievery.  It is a collaboration because Yukiko is complicit in my embezzlement.

 

Artist’s statement: Yukiko Launois

I am first and foremost a photography editor.  That was my career and I never took a photograph myself until after my retirement 10 years ago.  Then I began editing the real world and putting my choice on film.  I am an observer of nature and I try to choose the purest beauty in it.

My idea of beauty is influenced by my upbringing in Japan.  As a girl I learned classical Japanese arts including calligraphy and flower arranging.  I rebelled against the classics and fell in love and married a French/American photojournalist, moving to New York.  But Japanese aesthetics remained in my DNA.

Taking photographs is my pleasure.  I do it for my own enjoyment and could never have seen myself as one of the many world-renowned photojournalists whose work I edited for Black Star and Corbis.  Pressure and deadlines are not for me.

Even so, when I am happy with a photograph I like to share it.  So I make note cards with my favorite images and send them to friends.

I was flattered when Tom asked me to do a joint show.  I was blown away when I saw some of his snow pictures.  His less-is-more kind of approach looked very Japanese to me.  I didn’t know I inspired him to do the work but my old editing instincts told me our photos would look good together.

_D6C2113 copy

Yukiko Launois and JoAnne Kalish ©JoeDiMaggio

_D6C2129 copy2

Yukiko Launois ©JoeDiMaggio

 

©JoeDiMaggio

Tom Sobolik ©JoeDiMaggio

Yukiko Launois ©JoeDiMaggio

 

©JoeDiMaggio

 

 

You Can’t Make This Up

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

“I hate artist’s statements. They are pretentious, and I am pretentious enough without adding to it. I have read too many statements about artists who are “exploring psycho/sexual boundaries” or artists who are “Concerned with the tension between x and y…” These statements are more for the artists, to convince themselves that they are creating something meaningful and of value. I reality you buy art because it connects with you, or it matches your couch, not because the artist was “depicting the hypocrisy of gender roles in a post modern America”. I am much more interested to hear what you think about my work, then to tell you what I think about it.”

Thann Clark

There are very few things that motivate me to the point of screaming, jumping up and down, or possibly wetting myself. I was introduced to a young man by the name of Thann Clark and I went to his webpage. What you’ve read above is his artist’s statement.  I am totally blessed that most of my friends are artists, whether  they use oil, water, pen, pencil, cameras, blues, jazz, poetry, or ballet; they’re all artists. I strongly recommend to Thann that he should get his statement copyrighted and trademarked, because if he doesn’t, I’m going to steal it. This artists statement could go on from here to infinity. I’m throwing a photo in here just because I want to. Just for people to keep records, the above gorilla photograph was the number one selling greeting card for over two years. Canon EOS, 600 f4, 1/100th at f4, ISO 100, Gitzo monopod.

Embrace

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

Why would anybody put up this genre of photograph in June when obviously the photograph as taken in the dead of winter? That’s funny, I asked myself the same question. There are two basic reasons: the first is I just found this photo I had been trying to find for the last few years for my book, so I scanned it and now you have an opportunity to see it, and the second is I just liked the feeling. It makes me feel warm. Two lovers outside a coffeehouse in Greenwich Village. Very cold and snowy night. One grabbed shot, EOS camera, 85 1.2, ISO 200, 1/60th at f2. No rhyme or reason, I just like it.

Frame Grab

I’m not quite sure that the Lumiere brothers are not rolling around in their graves right now. Rapidly followed by W. Gene Smith and Gordon Parks. The more I know about this medium the less I know. If I’m running at 100 MPH forward, I’m probably in reverse. But, I promise myself I’ll try to keep up. This photograph is pretty amazing. Enjoy!
Following blog post by Vincent LaForet.
http://blog.vincentlaforet.com/2011/06/07/what-camera-did-i-use-to-make-this-still-picture/#more-5772

______________________________

What camera did I use to make this still picture?

Go ahead and guess what camera was used to make this photograph in the comments above.    It was made with a new camera that many photographers have not yet heard of… I suggest you click on the image above to see it at full resolution (and make sure you zoom in to 100%) Some of you will guess right away and already know about it…   Others will be astonished when I reveal what camera shot this photograph.    It’s a camera that has the potential to change things – radically.__________________________________________________________________________________________
ANSWER: This image is actually a FRAME GRAB.   It was not shot with a STILL camera but with the RED EPIC M digital cinema camera at 96 frames per second. For the techies:  The image was made with a Zeiss Compact Prime 25mm f 2.9 ,  natural light,  at  T 2.9 , 1/200th of a second at 800 ASA in RED’s RAW R3D format – a RAW format similar to aCR2 or NEF (for Canon and Nikon users respectively.)  
The camera’s “cinema” resolution is 5K – more than five times the resolution of your HD Television (see chart below)…     Other than a quick color correction – no enhancement whatsoever has been made to this image. Perhaps just as importantly : there were 95 other frames that were shot EACH SECOND that I rolled on the camera… 95 other shots to choose from… shot handheld on a moving subject – not posed.

Mermaid Parade

I remember my mother and father taking me to the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. Sitting on top of my dad’s shoulders and looking at the giant floats, the beautiful colors, the great music, and here we are a couple of years later spending the day at Coney Island at the Mermaid Parade. My new policy is one camera, one lens, two batteries, two cards. This time, I chose to test a new lens, a  135 f/2. Last year’s parade, I used a 10-22mm. Obviously, a huge change! But, changing it up is a good thing. What I’m about to say is not a scientific fact. It appeared to me for every person in the parade, there were 3 photographers. I could be off, but I’m not that far off.

Photos © Joe Dimaggio

Queue the Rapids!

I was contracted by the Canadian Olympic Association to photograph basketball, boxing, soccer, track and field, and kayaking. I fell in love with kayaking and proceeded to kayak for the next 20 years and moved to ocean kayaking. One of the things that I used kayaking for was eye-hand coordination and remote photography. Will try to dig out some of the film- Yes, Alice, there was film in those days! I’ll see if I can show you a few examples. But, in the interim, every once and a while I like to take the rust off and go photograph kayaking. Here are a few frames. Hope you enjoy them. Shutter speed ranged between a 500 and 1000, ISO 200. 80 to 200 mm lens. Pick a number- f4.5.