Great Yellow Father

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

To all the ships at sea,

The majority of photographers I’ve come to know over the years were weaned on TriX, Plus X, Panatomic X, Kodacrome 1,2, 25, 64, and High Speed Ektachrome. I affectionally called Kodak “The Great Yellow Father.” Well, the last time I did a lecture at RIT about eight years ago I stopped by to see a Vice President of Kodak who is a friend of mine. While walking to his office I could hear the echo of my footsteps. The handwriting had been on the wall for at least 5-8 years prior to that, lets call it 1999. And one of the final indications was when Dano Steinhardt left Kodak for Epson. I know Dano loved Kodak. He had to do what was right for him and for his family. Covering the heavyweight championship fight in Rochester, killing six hours, I looked up to see the Kodak tower. It was sad. One of the security people told me they were going to convert it to a community college. There is no doubt that George Eastman is doing cartwheels in his grave. One of the oldest most powerful and greatest longest lasting corporations in america. Very sad, very sad. I’m looking above me three computers, theres a roll of Kodacrome 200, 25 and Ektachrome X. I don’t why I have it, but it’s there.

IMG_0854

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

Delray? IcK!

Delray © Kalish 1521hpS e

© JoAnne Kalish

I walked past JoAnne’s desk the other day and saw this photo and was knocked on my ___ ___ ___… okay, my ass. Simple, clean, elegant… until I saw the name! IcK! I don’t like titles, any titles! Yes, in recent days I have been forced to come up with titles, but you know what makes a great title? “Untitled”! I like that title!  I am going to try everything in the world to get JoAnne to change the title of this to “Untitled” or “Beach”, or maybe “Sand” or “Soft”. So by now you have probably put two and two together and figured out that I don’t like titles… but I love this photograph. It’s a direct contradiction to what JoAnne does so well. No title necessary.

Oh my God, JoAnne just used a word  “yes”! To all the ships at sea, please note the time and date because the next time this happens Haley’s comet will be going over your head!

Hockey’s Greatest Photos

 

©Bruce Bennett

©Bruce Bennett

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

©Bruce Bennett

©Bruce Bennett

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To all the ships at sea,

Honesty is the best policy.  Most photographers can range from good, to mediocre, to fine, to great, to super.  Regardless of whether they’re an amateur, a pro, an advanced whatever, they all seem to have one thing in common, they aren’t good businessmen.  Neil Leifer, Jay Mizell, Pete Turner, great photographers, great businessmen.  Which leads me to a book with a very modest name, Hockey’s Greatest Photos, by Bruce Bennett.  Before seeing the book, and just hearing the name, I think I said four wow’s.  The book arrived on my doorstep today, and you know what, they may not be all the greatest hockey photos, but there’s a whole lot of great photos in this book.  If you’re a hockey aficionado, if you’re a hockey player, if you’re from Canada, Boston New York, anywhere theres an NHL team, you must own this book.  Bruce, are you really going to give me $2 a  book for endorsement?  That’s me trying to be funny.  If anyone knows Bruce, he’s not giving anyone any money, that’s also me trying to be funny.  Bruce, I take my beret off to you.  Are you the same Bruce Bennett that use to assist me?  Hm… I wonder…  Well, I’ll leave you with this, there’s an old Italian saying, “Mazel Tov, You’re a real mensch.”

 

                                                           The Hockey News

                   Hockey’s Greatest Photos The Bruce Bennett Collection

                             Forewords by Wayne Gretzky & Martin Brodeur

The Hockey News’ latest book, Hockey’s Greatest Photos: The Bruce Bennett Collection, is the perfect pickup for the diehard hockey fan. As the “Wayne Gretzky of hockey photography,” Bruce Bennett is known as the best in the business, and he has put together the definitive collection of the game’s best photos from his 40-plus years shooting hockey.

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then Hockey’s Greatest Photos is a 250,000-word epic. In it, Bennett reveals 250 of his best photos taken from an archive that runs to more than two million images shot over his four decades in hockey. He captures it all: competition, camaraderie, iconic moments, amazing goals, sizzling saves, bone-crushing hits, and off-ice hilarity. He covers every emotion associated with the game, from the ecstasy of victory to the agony of defeat, and he does so from every conceivable angle. Whether on the ice, from the corner, in the stands, behind the bench, beside the penalty box, inside the net or in the dressing room, Hockey’s Greatest Photos immortalizes the essence of the game.

About The Photographer:

For 40 years Bruce Bennett has covered hockey. Bruce shot his first Stanley Cup final in Philadelphia in 1976 as the Montreal Canadiens defeated the Flyers. Since then, he has covered 35 Cup finals, 26 All-Star Games, more than 375 international games including four Winter Olympics, and more than 4,500 NHL games. In addition, Bruce has been the team photographer for several Stanley Cup winning teams including the New York Islanders, New Jersey Devils, and New York Rangers. Bruce’s company Bruce Bennett Studios (BBS) and its archive of two million hockey images was acquired by Getty Images in 2004, and Bruce joined the company as a staff photographer.

About the Book:

Hockey’s Greatest Photos: The Bruce Bennett Collection

By The Hockey News

Photographs by Bruce Bennett

Forewords by Wayne Gretzky & Martin Brodeur

On-sale October 6th, 2015

The Hockey News

ISBN: 9781988002125  $39.95 CAN $34.95 US

eBook ISBN: 9781476782522 $15.99 $12.99

For media inquiries or requests for promotional images please contact Katie.callaghan@simonandschuster.ca.

www.simonandschuster.ca

 

 

 

I think I used to shoot hockey in the day…

 

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe DiMaggio

 

 

 

Not Dark Yet

To all the ships at sea,

Everybody knows I’m 29 years old… thank god math is not my forte.  Saw Dylan in the day, he was great then, and he’s still great.  Here’s a lyric that just blows me away, it just fits 20515, “Sometimes my burden seems more than I can bear.  It’s not dark yet, but it’s getting there.  I was born here and I’ll die here against my will.  I know it looks like I’m moving, but I’m standing still.”

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe DiMaggio

All Great Lions go to Heaven

©Joe Di Maggio

©Joe Di Maggio

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An immensely popular lion known as Cecil was killed recently outside of Zimbabwe’s Hwange National Park, and authorities are trying to find the hunter said to have lured the animal beyond park boundaries before shooting him with a crossbow.

The 13-year-old black-maned lion, who wore a GPS collar and was part of an Oxford University research project, was found skinned on private property adjacent to the vast Africa wilderness preserve.

The death of Cecil, beloved by Hwange’s staff and its frequent visitors, cast a pall over the preserve, and left many stunned in disbelief.

Reads a comment from a frequent visitor on the Hwange National Park Facebook Page: “I am so saddened to hear about Cecil. I do hope that his murder is not in vain. Hopefully, the investigation will shine a light on the person who lured him out to kill him.”

Fueling the anger is that Cecil did not die immediately. The wounded lion was tracked for nearly two days after it was shot, and ultimately dispatched with a rifle.

According to the Zimbabwe Conservation Task Force, the hunting party used an animal carcass to lure Cecil outside the park boundary. Because the cat wore a GPS collar, it was simple to trace its final movements.

Though many lions have been killed after being lured to legal hunting zones with bait, authorities maintain that this was an illegal hunt. They’ve arrested two men belonging to the hunting party, but are still seeking the trigger man.

The hunter, who reportedly paid about $55,000 to kill a trophy lion, was  a member of the Zimbabwe Professional Hunters and Guides Association, but that group stated viaFacebook that the hunter was “in violation of the ethics of ZPHGA,” and that his membership has been suspended.

Part of the statement reads, “The ZPHGA reiterates it will not tolerate any illegal hunting or any unethical practices by any of its members and their staff.”

Cecil had become accustomed to visitors in Hwange National Park. He was often spotted on the main road by visitors, and had become a park icon and its most photographed animal.

His loss leaves a void in his pride that will be filled by another male lion, and that could jeopardize the health of Cecil’s 12 cubs, as a new lion establishes his dominance over the pride. (New males often kill cubs to encourage the female to mate.)

While the investigation continues, the incident has reignited the debate about the wisdom of trophy hunting in general, but especially near protected wilderness areas.

-Pete Thomas

Article

©Brent Staplecamp

©Brent Staplecamp

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peter, Paul, and Mary… God do I miss Mary.

One of my first photography assignments was to photograph Peter, Paul, and Mary.   I will never ever forget it.  For all you technical wizards out there wanting to know why this photo is square, I shot it with a Mamiya C3, 180 mm lens, Tri-X Pushed to 1200, processed in Aquafine, and printed on #3 paper.  Imagine what you could do today… who would believe it?  They start at ISO 1000 today.  Mary Travers controlled the concert.  She was one of the strongest women I have ever met, and one of the most beautiful.  Long live the music, it will go on forever.

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe Di Maggio

You May Not Believe in God

 

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe DiMaggio

I consider myself extremely lucky, and without plagiarizing Lou Gehrig, I’m one of the luckiest people in the world.  I’ve received 3 doctorate degrees over my years of traveling this blue marble they call the Earth.  Another reason I consider myself very lucky is I have great friends.  The majority of them are either scientists or artists, but all of them, to a man and a woman, are considerably smarter than I am.  It’s a good thing to have highly intelligent friends because I never stop learning.  What the hell does this have to do with God?  When you look at a lion in the middle of the jungle, and you look into the lion’s eyes, it’s one of the most amazing visions you’ll ever see.  The lion will look back at you, and you will feel terror, fear, love, and respect at the same time.   But the majesty, the beauty, the strength, is off the charts.  The lion didn’t get the name “King of the Beasts” because it was a flea.  I would like to share with you a few photographs.

Under normal circumstances, I would try not to judge my fellow man.  But I’m going to make an exception on this low life piece of s*** who chose to wound a beautiful animal, and then take a half a day to kill it.  If I could get my hands on him, I’d put an arrow to his thigh close to his groin, and watch him take a day to die.  God forgive me for a bad thought.  In case anybody hasn’t figured it out, we are killing this planet.  Everyday, we’re killing this planet.  There’s an old cliche, people who live in glass houses should not throw rocks, so in the interest of being open and above board, there was a period of time in the 70’s that I would fish for large game fish.  Every ounce of those fish were eaten and nothing went to waste.  The only reason that this even happened is because I was filming for Sports Illustrated, HBO, Discovery Channel, etc., etc., etc..  99.9% of every fish I caught was tagged and released.  For the record today, if I go fishing, I fish with a camera only.

©Joe DiMaggio

©JoAnne Kalish

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe DiMaggio

_D6C9008 copy

©Unknown

 

A Beautiful Young Woman

When we closed our studio in Manhattan, and relocated to the Upper Delaware Valley, one of the problems we had was finding great models that had flexible schedules.  I was extremely fortunate to run into an extremely beautiful young lady by the name of Luisa Weinstein.  As it turns out, her husband Michael and I attended the same high school, Richmond High School, a couple of years back.  Michael’s a great trial attorney and was the District Attorney of Pike County.  While cleaning up an old file, I came across this photograph of Luisa, just thought I would share it with you.  Luisa and I did several shoots where she was an actress, an airline attendant, an ER doctor, an EMS tech, the list goes on.  The camera really loves her.

©Joe Di Maggio

©Joe Di Maggio

A Great Voyage

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe DiMaggio

One of the greatest advantages of being a working photographer is the travel.  I’ve been blessed and lucky to literally travel around the world more than once.  When you travel, you meet people, and 90% of the time, the people you meet are unbelievably fabulous.  In 1984, I had he privilege of being one of the pool photographers for the Olympics in Los Angeles.  It allowed me to meet up with many of my old friends from SI and work with George Long, John Iacono, John Zimmerman, and the list goes on.

©JoeDiMaggio

©JoeDiMaggio

Hi Joe,

I miss Gary, too.

I’d buy the book, but I have to sell about 20 photos to pay for it!!

Take care and stay well,

Alan

I met an extremely bright and creative (at that time he was assisting) photographer by the name of Alan Levenson.  Suffices to say, Alan when onto an unbelievable career in photography, and he’s now one of my favorite portrait photographers.  His environmental/corporate portraits are great.  Alan was kind enough the other day to purchase one of our new books, “Halloween.”  I will attach his email to the bottom of this blog.  Alan lived through the last part of the Golden Age of photography.  His words are to the point and unfortunately, quite true.  But who knows.  In moving ahead in the digital world at light speed, we, as a group of photographers, may transcend time and in going forward, we may go backwards.  Now, if that sounds like I’ve been drinking in the afternoon… I haven’t.  As a matter of fact, to all the ships at sea, I’ve decided to put the alcohol down for six months to a year.  Well… like Lloyd Bridges said in Airplane, “Looks like I picked a bad week to quit amphetamines.”

Alan Levenson Webpage

 

©Alan Levenson

©Alan Levenson

©Alan Levenson

©Alan Levenson

Neil Leifer, One of a Kind

There’s no doubt that Neil Leifer is one of the all time great sports photographers.  I’m pretty sure he has at least half a million Sports Illustrated covers alone, and I think it’s fair to say that there aren’t any weak ones.  Neil came up with what I consider a great documentary on four photographers who have photographed every super bowl.  Photographers and filmmakers should have great hand-eye coordination and should always be in the right place at the right time.  Neil knows how to do that, but he goes one step further, he’s a visionary.  I would imagine hundreds of photographers would have said, “Wow, I wish I would have thought of that.”  He thought of that and made it happen.  His film is called Keepers of the Streak features the only four photographers in the world that have covered all 48 Super Bowls, starting from one in 1967 to 2014.  It stars Walter Iooss, Mickey Palmer, Tony Tomsic, and John Biever.

 

©NeilLeifer

©NeilLeifer

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