IN THIS CORNER!

To All the Ships at Sea,

All Photos © Joe DiMaggio

Many of you know that I set out to do a 10 minute video on boxing at Gleason’s Gym about 10-12 years ago. The concept was JoAnne ringside talking about her experiences photographing boxing as a woman, in a man’s sport with a woman’s viewpoint, in at the time a male photographic oriented business.

Well that day turned into the beginning of a long film called In This Corner and it’s been an on-going project ever since. It’s out of pure passion and love for the sport (you also have to know, that I have a love hate relationship with boxing as there are many bad sides of boxing.) Every once in a while you’ll come across a few boxers who make it but the majority of these boxers never actually get from point A to point B.  I had an opportunity to photograph the Terrance Crawford vs. Felix Diaz fight two weeks ago. I made a decision to give up my credentials for the the fight after driving thirteen hours to North Carolina to photograph one of the brightest young boxers by the name of Khalid, one of the protagonists in my film. We worked a 14 hour day and the last fight was supposed to go off at 10 PM but actually started at 12:30AM. We started at 10 in the morning, so by that time, we were seriously dragging ass and one of the corner workers – in  Mr. so-and-so’s corner took objections to our photography position after shooting what 17 fights?  I made a decision that if you have nothing else to do but give us a hard time after just trying to do our job, we’re leaving so we left.  You know what happened?  They got no national exposure because when the digital images were turned into Zuma Press there were no photos of their number one fighter so no publicity. Oh well… I guess that’s the way it goes….

Today Was A Catch-28!

To All the Ships At Sea –

Pretty sure most of you read Joseph Heller’s book CATCH-22.  Well today I had a Catch-28!  Called Amazon and explained my name was spelled wrong in my Amazon book listing and the publisher’s name was wrong.  They said no problem…please hold.  I was on hold for four minutes and decided I should water my basil…which I did…still on hold. With that Peter Poremba, the CEO of Dynalite called and I abruptly told him, I’d call him back.  Seven minutes into my hold,  Al Stegmeyer from Upstrap called. I also blew him off.  Their music was starting to drive me crazy so I decided to go brush my teeth.  Still waiting… I gargled.  We are now 12 minutes into the hold and I figured well… I’m in the bathroom…. Now 15 minutes into it, I decided to take a quick shower. I quickly, jumped out of the tub and wrapped a towel around me and my friend Sam Garcia called.  Also blew him off and said I’d get back.  Went outside, still waiting, I watered my tomatoes, and went back into the studio. With that JoAnne asked me where I had been?  I simply said I’ve been on hold.  Twenty four minutes later, the lovely lady told me there was nothing they could do about it and to call the Publisher and tell them to make the changes.  She said it would probably take till July to implement them.  The first line in my new book FILL THE FRAME  is six months ago, I was 20 years old.  That’s how fast life is…light speed plus.  Time is like gold – more valuable than material things.

If you want to read a great book (FILL THE FRAME) – see reviews.    Attached link to short video – http://FILL THE FRAME https://vimeo.com/220041332

Live, Love, Laugh & be Happy – hold on a minute I will get back to you.  film is 28 seconds… time is very valuable…

A Great Friend Don Nelson

 

To all the Ships at Sea-

  • 2017 has not been the greatest year for many of my friends. It’s been a great year for me but not so good for them!  My dear friend Don Nelson, one of the most powerful, beautiful human beings, with a awesome sense of humor has gone to the great darkroom in the sky, making a short detour  to Grandfather mountain where he helped thousands of photographers over the years.  He’s joined his beautiful wife Christine , and they are now traveling together into infinity.  A quick story about Don, back in the 80’s it was not uncommon for him to pop in and out of the White House.  One day he popped in giving the press secretary Larry Speakes an acorn asking him to give it to the old man.  Larry said, it just an acorn.  Don told him to crack it on the desktop (in those days desktops were made out of oak not glass.)  He cracked it and out popped a condom.  He laughed and said the old man is on his way to Andrew’s and inquired how many more he had.  Don gave him maybe 6 or 7.  Don headed back to Virginia  & maybe thirty minutes later he got a phone call from Air force One. In those days car phones looked like house phones.  A woman asked if he’d accept a call from the President of the United States. Of course Don said yes. Ronald Reagon got on the line laughing so hard and asked Don if he could get him a couple dozen so he could send them out to his friends?  Don I loved you then and I love you now.  I will come visit you at Grandfather Mountain.  Live, Love, Laugh and Be Happy.  Life is great!

Don & President Reagan in Limo

Doreen Jacob

To All The Ships At Sea –

Anybody who knows me knows I’ve used the expression “I am one of the luckiest people in the world.”  One reason for that is I’ve met so many great people over the years.  My friend Simon Jacob is one of the most important.  Simon has taken us into his family. Simon and all the Jacob family was extremely blessed to have Doreen Jacob as the Matriarch of their tribe.  She’s was beautiful on the outside as well as so beautiful on in the inside.  Doreen was a very warm, caring strong, and spiritual woman that lit up the room when she entered it.

We will always hold beautiful thoughts of her in our hearts.  When she opened up the doors to her home to us,  she helped us to understand more about the true meaning of family and friendship.  I know Doreen’s soul will live within all of us.  She has just moved to a higher place and one day we hope to meet her again.  We thank her for her lessons.  Both JoAnne and I were truly blessed to know her in this life.

© JoAnne Kalish

My Friend Jim Morton

© Photo by Jim Morton

A friend, Jim Morton Sr., a really good photographer did this portrait and I would like to share it.

This is what Jim wrote me when he sent it along.  “I was asked to photograph our local Fire Department.  They needed head shots for their department folders and a group Image of all current firemen and the Mayor along with the chaplain of the Department.

After doing the formal portraits I asked if anyone would like to do some pictures with their fallout gear on in the engine bays.  All of the firemen said they would like to do it so it was time to have some fun.  I used the Dynalite Baja B4 with the Dynalite 47 inch Grand soft box. I asked Captain Eric Pearson to sit on the front bumper of the new department Pumper.  When looking through my viewfinder I noticed his reflection in the grill, and asked him move forward about 3-4 inched so his reflection would be seen completely.  I never told him why I wanted him to move because I wanted to surprise him when the image was printed.

This was not the original image I had in mind but once I saw it, I knew it was the shot.”

 

January 18th: Somebody’s Birthday

© Sam Garcia

To all the ships at sea,

As I’ve told you many times, I’m the luckiest guy in the world. 95% of all my friends are artists, photographers, blues and jazzmen, writers, poets, sculptors, boxers, and occasionally a copyright attorney. I’ve had a very long friendship with Sam Garcia. As a matter of fact, it goes back six decades. Well, we know that’s impossible because I’m only 29 years old… so obviously, I’ve misspoken. Sam, a very fine photographer, sometimes tends to continuously remind me of things. Maybe he feels that he has a responsibility to me. Hell, maybe that’s a good thing. The photo in the blog is a candid shot of Jay Maisel, copy written by Sam Garcia. I’m pretty sure that everybody who reads this blog knows who Jay is- one of the finest photographers in the last six or seven decades. And today, he’s 39 years old. Well Jay, wishing you one hell of a great birthday. Give Sam a hug and a squeeze for me.

RIP Photographer Howard Bingham by Joe DiMaggio

To All the Ships at Sea,

© Kenneth Lambert, AP

I’d like to share a story. My son Dylan came home from school from 4th grade class with a unusual request. He asked that I get Muhammad Ali to call all the kids in his class.  I told him that would not be easy.  He said please, “I’d like you to do this.” I called my good friend Bert Sugar – “Mr. Boxing”  and the “Bertster” tried to reach out to Ali, but was unable to connect.  He said, “Joe on a conference call we will phone Howard Bingham” (Ali’s photographer.)  I had met Howard a few times but we were not close friends.  We spoke to Howard and he said he’d see what he could do. He asked me, what time and on what phone number?”  I told him approximately 1:05 on Thursday afternoon & gave him the number. I figured there was a very slim chance of this happening.  I was told the call went through the speakers and sure enough It was Muhammad Ali talking to all the kids in Dylan’s grade class.

There are very few people and this goes for Bert Sugar, Howard Bingham and Muhammad Ali that would extend themselves for a bunch of kids.  I’m blessed knowing people like this.  I might add, it is mainly due to people I’ve met through photography.  Bert Sugar died on my birthday a few years ago, Muhammad Ali died this year and now Howard Bingham died December 15 this year.  I casually mentioned this story to my friend Sam Garcia and he insisted I do a blog on Howard, which I was going to do anyway.  He said you can tell your people from me, that Howard was one of the sweetest most self effacing people he had ever met.  He always remembered everyones’ name, was a genuinely sweet individual, and one hell of a great photographer.

We’ll have a 10 count tonight for Howard.  Attached you will find a short video I did in Cuba a few weeks ago at Kid Chocolate Gym.  https://vimeo.com/193916645

© Joe DiMaggio All Rights Reserved

© Joe DiMaggio

Sam by © Sam Garcia

 

Great Yellow Father

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

To all the ships at sea,

The majority of photographers I’ve come to know over the years were weaned on TriX, Plus X, Panatomic X, Kodacrome 1,2, 25, 64, and High Speed Ektachrome. I affectionally called Kodak “The Great Yellow Father.” Well, the last time I did a lecture at RIT about eight years ago I stopped by to see a Vice President of Kodak who is a friend of mine. While walking to his office I could hear the echo of my footsteps. The handwriting had been on the wall for at least 5-8 years prior to that, lets call it 1999. And one of the final indications was when Dano Steinhardt left Kodak for Epson. I know Dano loved Kodak. He had to do what was right for him and for his family. Covering the heavyweight championship fight in Rochester, killing six hours, I looked up to see the Kodak tower. It was sad. One of the security people told me they were going to convert it to a community college. There is no doubt that George Eastman is doing cartwheels in his grave. One of the oldest most powerful and greatest longest lasting corporations in america. Very sad, very sad. I’m looking above me three computers, theres a roll of Kodacrome 200, 25 and Ektachrome X. I don’t why I have it, but it’s there.

IMG_0854

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

White Gallery: The First Review Is In!

© JoAnne Kalish

© JoAnne Kalish

To all the ships at sea, take a look at our first review!

“From Commercial to Fine Art

 By Leon Graham

“Raindrop” is currently on display at The White Gallery. photo by Joe DiMaggio

“Crossing the Line,” now at The White Gallery in Lakeville, is a collection of work from three talented commercial photographers, good friends with award-winning credentials, who now make fine art  for their own pleasure. Throughout their careers they created images for magazine publishers, advertising agencies, major companies. Now they bring the same eye and originality to these very personal photographs.

Dennis Wheeler is best known for the many Time magazine covers he created. And created is the right word, because he made covers that were collages designed to grab attention on newsstands as well as comment on the cover subject in powerful ways. Four silhouetted male profiles — red, yellow, white, black — overlapped for a story on leadership in America. A cover on the sex explosion showed a young man and woman facing each other with much of their bodies covered by a giant fig leaf zippered down the middle.

At the White, Wheeler shows complex mixed media collages of carefully arranged objects, drawings, little photos, slashes of paint both long and short, all on brilliantly colored backgrounds.

“Pasture” stands out for its evocation of land and horses and the suggestion of fences. Made in browns and blues, the work is focused on a central black-and-white image of horses eating in a pasture. A gentle horse face peers at us from behind the pastured animals; there are small pictures of lakes too. All lie on swirls of thin, colored lines that suggest fencing wire.

JoAnne Kalish was the first woman photographer at Sports Illustrated. She is known for her ability to capture light and motion, as well as for the sensuality of many images. Her pictures of vegetables — two bell peppers at the White show — are luscious, rounded, inviting. Her pears are erotic and painterly. Even the two dogs meeting in “Venezia” seem about to begin a romance.

Kalish’s “Eiffel” is a pyramid of luminosity as if reflected in water. Her “Reflections” catches a small boat to the left tied up on a narrow canal, while buildings are reflected abstractly in the water on the right, which has the sheen of a mirror.

Kalish’s partner, Joe DiMaggio, is also a former Sports Illustrated and Time magazine photographer. (His and Kalisch’s images of professional hockey are now shown at the NHL Hall of Fame in Canada.) He worked for many advertising agencies, won many art direction awards. He is a master of suggesting motion in still photos. “Chevelle” shows a bright and shiny wheel cover that seems to be catching a passing landscape on its surface. In “Frankfurt,” a group of people are blurred so they appear in motion.

“Raindrop” catches a pearl of water as it is about to fall from the wide brim of a black cowboy hat that glistens from the moisture. We see only the nose and mouth of a man, who sports a marvelous neck bandana studded with white stars. “Infinity” is made of double yellow highway lines stretching into the distance between hazy trees and road shoulders that appear to converge up the road. It is wonderfully composed.

“Crossing the Line” continues at The White Gallery, 342 Main St. in Lakeville, Conn., through Sept. 9. The gallery is open Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 860-435-1029 or go to www.thewhitegalleryart.com.

 

“The Lakeville Journal, COMPASS,” August 4, 2016″

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

Wheeler 41A9786

© Dennis Wheeler

Delray? IcK!

Delray © Kalish 1521hpS e

© JoAnne Kalish

I walked past JoAnne’s desk the other day and saw this photo and was knocked on my ___ ___ ___… okay, my ass. Simple, clean, elegant… until I saw the name! IcK! I don’t like titles, any titles! Yes, in recent days I have been forced to come up with titles, but you know what makes a great title? “Untitled”! I like that title!  I am going to try everything in the world to get JoAnne to change the title of this to “Untitled” or “Beach”, or maybe “Sand” or “Soft”. So by now you have probably put two and two together and figured out that I don’t like titles… but I love this photograph. It’s a direct contradiction to what JoAnne does so well. No title necessary.

Oh my God, JoAnne just used a word  “yes”! To all the ships at sea, please note the time and date because the next time this happens Haley’s comet will be going over your head!