Alan Kaplan vs Peter B. Kaplan

© Joe DiMaggio

To All the Ships at Sea,

For whatever reason photographers rarely get together and socialize with each other.  Wow, what a shame that is.  Alan Kaplan, an internationally known photographer has been our neighbor for about 15 years. Only recently did we get together to break bread.  I’m only sorry we didn’t do this sooner. Alan’s wife Wendy is an international producer of films and a world class model.  Everybody knows my partner JoAnne and as Bill Shatner would say “also one of the finest photographers in the United States.”  Our lunch was wonderful as well as the conversation. Alan is one of the few intellectual photographers.  He’s not a button pusher he puts a whole lot of thought into his photography and his place on the planet.  Wendy is diametrically opposite – she’s a very quiet woman of few words, totally laid back, with no particular positions on politics, the human condition, or most matters.  NOT!  Wendy is very outspoken and dynamic. Don’t get on her bad side because she’s a tough broad which is a good thing!  Alan’s studio was one floor apart from my friend Peter B. Kaplan’s -another world class photographer and also was next to the artist who put the capital © in copyright but that’s separate blog.  That evening the four of us continued onto Malibu ranch to photograph a rodeo and had a great time which was   followed by a late night dinner at the Fauchére.  It doesn’t get better than that.

In a month or so Alan will be having a show on Ethiopia at Lenox Hill Hospital.

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

 

Hockey’s Greatest Photos

 

©Bruce Bennett

©Bruce Bennett

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

©Bruce Bennett

©Bruce Bennett

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To all the ships at sea,

Honesty is the best policy.  Most photographers can range from good, to mediocre, to fine, to great, to super.  Regardless of whether they’re an amateur, a pro, an advanced whatever, they all seem to have one thing in common, they aren’t good businessmen.  Neil Leifer, Jay Mizell, Pete Turner, great photographers, great businessmen.  Which leads me to a book with a very modest name, Hockey’s Greatest Photos, by Bruce Bennett.  Before seeing the book, and just hearing the name, I think I said four wow’s.  The book arrived on my doorstep today, and you know what, they may not be all the greatest hockey photos, but there’s a whole lot of great photos in this book.  If you’re a hockey aficionado, if you’re a hockey player, if you’re from Canada, Boston New York, anywhere theres an NHL team, you must own this book.  Bruce, are you really going to give me $2 a  book for endorsement?  That’s me trying to be funny.  If anyone knows Bruce, he’s not giving anyone any money, that’s also me trying to be funny.  Bruce, I take my beret off to you.  Are you the same Bruce Bennett that use to assist me?  Hm… I wonder…  Well, I’ll leave you with this, there’s an old Italian saying, “Mazel Tov, You’re a real mensch.”

 

                                                           The Hockey News

                   Hockey’s Greatest Photos The Bruce Bennett Collection

                             Forewords by Wayne Gretzky & Martin Brodeur

The Hockey News’ latest book, Hockey’s Greatest Photos: The Bruce Bennett Collection, is the perfect pickup for the diehard hockey fan. As the “Wayne Gretzky of hockey photography,” Bruce Bennett is known as the best in the business, and he has put together the definitive collection of the game’s best photos from his 40-plus years shooting hockey.

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then Hockey’s Greatest Photos is a 250,000-word epic. In it, Bennett reveals 250 of his best photos taken from an archive that runs to more than two million images shot over his four decades in hockey. He captures it all: competition, camaraderie, iconic moments, amazing goals, sizzling saves, bone-crushing hits, and off-ice hilarity. He covers every emotion associated with the game, from the ecstasy of victory to the agony of defeat, and he does so from every conceivable angle. Whether on the ice, from the corner, in the stands, behind the bench, beside the penalty box, inside the net or in the dressing room, Hockey’s Greatest Photos immortalizes the essence of the game.

About The Photographer:

For 40 years Bruce Bennett has covered hockey. Bruce shot his first Stanley Cup final in Philadelphia in 1976 as the Montreal Canadiens defeated the Flyers. Since then, he has covered 35 Cup finals, 26 All-Star Games, more than 375 international games including four Winter Olympics, and more than 4,500 NHL games. In addition, Bruce has been the team photographer for several Stanley Cup winning teams including the New York Islanders, New Jersey Devils, and New York Rangers. Bruce’s company Bruce Bennett Studios (BBS) and its archive of two million hockey images was acquired by Getty Images in 2004, and Bruce joined the company as a staff photographer.

About the Book:

Hockey’s Greatest Photos: The Bruce Bennett Collection

By The Hockey News

Photographs by Bruce Bennett

Forewords by Wayne Gretzky & Martin Brodeur

On-sale October 6th, 2015

The Hockey News

ISBN: 9781988002125  $39.95 CAN $34.95 US

eBook ISBN: 9781476782522 $15.99 $12.99

For media inquiries or requests for promotional images please contact Katie.callaghan@simonandschuster.ca.

www.simonandschuster.ca

 

 

 

I think I used to shoot hockey in the day…

 

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe DiMaggio

 

 

 

Happy Birthday Gerry

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe DiMaggio

To all the ships at sea, 

I would like to share a little story about my 35th birthday.  Gerry Cooney showed up at my studio and delivered a beautiful birthday gift.  The box was unbelievably light, but it was wrapped beautifully, it had a beautiful card. I opened it up, and it was a black negligee, size petit.  I said, “Gerry, I’ll never fit in this.”  He said, “you’ll figure out something to do with it.”  So Gerry, happy 29th birthday… oops, I mean 39th birthday, oops.  You’ll always be forever young.  In writing my memoirs, I have four chapters on Gerry Cooney, my publisher is insisting I get them down to one reasonably large chapter, which I will do.

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe DiMaggio

©JoeDiMaggio

©JoAnne Kalish                                                      One point low blow.

 

Rodeo, the Only Ones Hurt are usually the Contestants not the animals!

©Joe Di Maggio

©Joe Di Maggio

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To all the ships at sea,

I remember the first time I heard the expression, “It’s not my first rodeo.”  Well a few years ago, when I shot my first rodeo, I told the head Wrangler, “This is my first rodeo,” he thought that was pretty funny.  I will share this with you, I am totally petrified of horses.  The same way I’m petrified of skiing.  When I was 16 years old, never on skis, I was taken to the top of Terry Peak South Dakota Mountain, and put on the solid ice expert trail.  About an hour later, bruised, battered, and bleeding, I walked into the Chalet… get the idea?  Same year, two friends took me horseback riding, sneakers, no socks.  Some people just never learn.  I think I still have the scars on my ankles.  Galloping before I could walk, maybe that’s my life story.

©Joe Di Maggio

©Joe Di Maggio

For our rodeo on Saturday, we had light rain.  I love shooting in the rain, whether it’s in Manhattan, Big Sur, or a Rodeo.  It really adds another dimension, a forth dimension, very very cool.  Basic rule of thumb; much higher ISO.  It was almost the longest day of the year, but 7:00 it was 0 dark thirty.  I kicked my ISO up to 3200, shot with my 200 mm f/1.8 (which looks like it went through Afghanistan twice, but it’s sharp as a tack), paired it with a 5d Mark lll, which is a well sealed camera,  and tried to keep my shutter speed up to 1/1500 at f/2.0.  You can see the results below, very shallow depth of field, but stopped the action quite well.  I very rarely shoot on continuous, but with rodeo, I make an exception.  Traditionally I shoot a lot of verticals, in rodeo, a lot of horizontals.  Bagged the camera (hermetically sealed with a white garbage bag).  My team members had a great time, everybody had a great time, and thank God none of the cowboys got hurt, and all of the animals were fine as well.  Life is good.  As my friend Willie Nelson would say, “I’ll see you on the road again.”

On July 18th.  See link below.

Next Rodeo

©Joe Di Maggio

©Joe Di Maggio

©Joe Di Maggio

©Joe Di Maggio

 

_D6C6477 copy

©Joe Di Maggio

 

_D6C6635 copy

©Joe Di Maggio

©Joe Di Maggio

©Joe Di Maggio

 

Ace could win Westminister, or maybe Belmont… I don’t know which one.

©Joe Di Maggio

©Joe Di Maggio

Like most photographers, when I’m feeling a little rusty, especially with my hand eye coordination (that really shouldn’t happen if your 25 years old right?), or if  just want to check out a new camera or new lens, I’ll take my best friend (my best male friend), Ace… my puppalupus.  He’s so much fun to be around, and to be honest with you, he makes one hell of a great model, especially when he makes eye contact.  I think what he’s saying is, “Joe I love you,” “Joe, if you get a hoop and set it on fire, I’ll jump through that.”  How many of our friends would do that?

To all the ships at sea, when you’re feeling a little rusty, go out and rent a puppy, steal a cat, or go to the zoo.

Have a great day.

©Joe Di Maggio

©Joe Di Maggio

 

©Joe Di Maggio

©Joe Di Maggio

Don’t Wait 38 Years to Look at Your Take

What’s interesting about photography is that you spend the first five years learning all of the basic fundamental rules.  Things like; F-stops, apertures, depth of field, depth of focus, the geometric progression of 1.4, and you make five or ten mistakes a day everyday, for the next ten years.  Then when you hit year twenty, you think, who the hell are you, and in reality, well… it’s not for me to say who you are, what you are, or where you’re going.  You try desperately to perfect your visual literacy, and communicate your vision with the rest of the world.  You’ll probably have to die before it’s ever recognized on certain levels, and then believe it or not, it may be too late.  Unless of coarse you believe that you’re moving to another level of consciousness, which I choose to believe.  Not afraid of dying, just hope there’s some developer left in the tank when I get there… or maybe 100 terabytes of space in the hard drive.  In 1977, Sports Illustrated gave me an assignment to cover the World Series.  I shot approximately 30 roles of film.  They were sent into the lab, processed, they ran what they ran, and then the film came back with my X-Number on it.  They sat in the file waiting for me to return from Greece where I was for a month shooting an advertising assignment, and then two weeks off in Santorini.  By the time I got back, there were several more Sports Illustrated assignments that year.  The long in the short of it is, I never saw the film until 10 weeks ago, so what you’re about to see is 38 years old.  It’s been 38 years that I had an opportunity to look at my take.  As my good friend Willy Nelson and Ralph Brandofino would say, “You better take some time to smell the roses.”  Three first pitch home runs by New York Yankee, Reggie Jackson.

To all the ships at see, smell the roses.

©JoeDiMaggio

©JoeDiMaggio

 

Oh My God, it’s May!

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

To all the ships at sea,

If it’s May, it has to be the Indianapolis 500. This photograph was selected by Sports Illustrated as the third greatest photograph in the last 100 years of the 500. They reproduced it in the centennial issue and on their website. That’s the good news, the bad news is they never asked me. Does the word “copyright” mean anything to anyone? Who said “power to the people”? No, it’s “power to the corporation”, step on all the people. In this society, we all have to play by the same rules. Actually, I think someone wrote that in the Constitution. To my friends; go out and make some great photos. Capture history with a camera. Life is good, life is great. Health and happiness to everybody, even SI.

Shooting From the Inside Out 2

Hi to All the Sips at Sea,

While working on an essay called America, I came across some college students at the U of A who were heavy into mountain biking. We did all of the classic cliché photos and then I decided we can do better. So I took one of the small Canon cameras with a 15mm lens and a remote cord and put it at the end of a painters pole and was actually able (for a  millisecond) to get the camera under the tire as the young man did a wheely.

 

All the Best,

Joe D

You can now follow me on Twitter @dimaggio_photo
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The Right Exposure

To All the Ships at Sea.

I had the opportunity to do an ad campaign for the Cleveland Indians. As part of the contract, I did several billboard,. one of which, Shaun Casey was the star. The key to this photograph is Casey’s eyes and his intensity. The ball was not on the bat yet, but very close. If you were to utilize the correct daylight exposure his eyes would have been shaded by the cap.  By opening up a half to three quarters of a stop, you will have the correct exposure for under his cap and his eyes. The same is true for a football player or race car driver with his helmet on. If looking for the eyes, you have to make the right adjustments.

 

That’s my tip for today. Finish reading the blog then go out and make some photos. Joe D

Kayaking with Murphy

Photo ©Joe DiMaggio

You would think after several decades of making photographs there would be no surprises, but the greatest thing about photography is that there’s always a surprise. You can pre plan everything to the final millimeter, you can pick the perfect day for light, you can have the best athletes or models, but invariably something will come up and will bite you on the –whatever. This is a perfect example, of Murphy rearing his ugly head. We planned this shoot several months ago waiting for the right rain conditions so we could make great photographs on the upper portions of the Raymondskill Creek. Cue the cameras! Cue the kayakers, let’s go! But Murphy cued three logs that broke loose and were blocking the creek. Ya can’t kayak over a log, and you can’t kayak through a log, so we went to plan B. Plan B was a 44 foot drop. To put that into perspective, that s a 4 story building straight down. The problem with the shot is the extreme heavy mist. It was like putting a Tupperware cap over your lens. The front element of the lens was absolutely soaking wet all the time and as we all know, anything put in front of a lens will degrade the image. I was shooting with the Sigma 150-500 and I didn’t have the underwater version- OK that’s me trying to be funny again. One of the keys in photography is your ability to be flexible, when you don’t get what you want- you gotta get something. We hiked up one more mile to a tributary and were able to get a 30 foot drop shot with the 24-70 Sigma. ISO and exposure are approximately the same; the difference would be considerably less mist. Keep on shooting, it’s all good. Next time I see you- I’ll have a brand new set of wheels- half titanium and half ceramic.

Joe D

 

Photos ©Joe DiMaggio