Looking Forward to a New Year

© White Gallery

© White Gallery

To all the ships at sea,

Well, all good things must come to an end. The Wheeler-Kalish-DiMaggio show at the White Gallery has come to an end. A great end, but an end nonetheless. From my vantage point, the ability to share a gallery with two amazing artists was a wonderful experience.  It was an awful lot of fun and extremely rewarding on many different levels with the two gallery owners, Tino and Susan, as well. Dennis, myself, and JoAnne, along with Tino and Susan, entered into this experiment with an open mind and like many things in my life and my career I came away learning something. Ninety-nine percent of the time it’s positivity, and in this particular case everything was positive. Great venue, show, people, support, and communication- what else could you ask for? To say nothing of the fact that all three of us artists had substantial sales of our work. I’m having a lunch tomorrow with Dennis and JoAnne and we are looking forward to our next show together. Life is good, sky is blue, the clouds are white. I continue to learn a little bit more about life everyday. So please pick up your cameras and go out and make some fine photos.

P.S. It’s free, and all the great things in life are free!

Hope to see you on the road,

Joe D.

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© Joe DiMaggio

© JoAnne Kalish

© JoAnne Kalish

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

An Absolute Great Day at the White Gallery

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© Rene

To all the ships at sea,

I may be dumb but I’m not stupid. Did I say that? Maybe I should rethink it. I understand that I go on rants sometimes and talk about people who have recently passed. My agent reminded me, “You’re not writing obituaries.” Recently I’ve been on a roll, or we’ll call it a rock and roll. There’ve been good things, better things, great things and fun things. Life is good. Normally I would not share this, but why not?

Dennis, JoAnne, and I were back in the White Gallery and gave a forty minute talk (which lasted over two hours). Believe it or not I didn’t have a lot to say. Another great day, three great friends, and a few more sales. I’m attaching a private letter.

Life is good, go out and make some great photos,

Joe D.

“Hi JoAnne,

Thank you for sending us these photos.

It was really great seeing you and Joe yesterday.

It was a very special day, sharing some of the great things you and Joe have accomplished; we will not forget.

I am so happy Ericca was with us.

She acknowledged Joe’s commitment and love for you.

It made me very happy that she not only saw and heard about the great work both of you have accomplished but that she also witnessed the incredible team the two of you are.

Congratulations!

Thank you for inviting me.

Love,

Lee”

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© JoAnne Kalish

White Gallery: A Great Time Was Had By All

© Joe DiMaggio

© White Gallery

At a time where the world seems to be in total chaos with the economy all over the place and many of our friends suffering from minor depression, we tend to see the glass 3/4’s empty.  I’m here to remind you that’s just not true.  Both JoAnne and I have made major inroads in opening up new avenues for our photography.  We have assignments to photograph Hillary Clinton and Vice President Joe Biden,  I will be in Rochester shooting a heavyweight fight, and that Sunday the 21st we will be going back to the White Gallery in Lakeville, CT to give a lecture on “Crossing the Lines” for our recent gallery show.

I’m attaching a few photos from our opening reception, which was extremely successful.  We sold two pieces – you could not have asked for a better opening. My friends, our glass is overflowing thank God!  I don’t know if it’s dedication or just blind luck.  Either way it’s great.  Wishing you some great Karma in whatever you’re working on now.  Put a smile on your face – it’s all good.  Go for it.  

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

© JoAnne Kalish

© JoAnne Kalish

The Greatest Things In Life are Free

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© Joe DiMaggio

My partner and best friend JoAnne Kalish and I try to go to a new gallery at least twice a month and when we are in Manhattan we sometimes can visit three in a day. You’d be surprised what you can learn from looking at others’  art, regardless of the medium. There was an artist in Miami that had 500 prints of the same photograph in a stack. Not something that I would do, but it was very cool. Both JoAnne, myself, and  dear friend Dennis Wheeler have discovered a fabulous boutique gallery in Lakeville, Connecticut. The owner and curator, Tino Galluzzo, has not only a great eye but is an extremely well rounded, smart entrepreneur. As far as the free stuff goes, he’s got a fabulous smile as well! If you’re within 50 miles of the White Gallery in Lakeville, CT , I would like to cordially invite you to come see the show. When you walk in, you’ll understand why they call it the White Gallery- makes perfect sense to me.

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© Joe DiMaggio

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©JoAnne Kalish

To all the ships at sea: Welcome.

White Gallery DSC3462 window

© Joe DiMaggio

To all the ships at sea: Welcome. (You can figure out the morse code!)Learn-morse-code-alphabet

Kalish: In the Permanent Collection (Portrait Section) of the National Gallery of Art Washington D.C.

© Joe DiMaggio

To all the ships at sea,

JoAnne Kalish has an extremely small ego and a great talent. If you sipped a cup of tea, had a glass of Chardonnay, or had a Jack Daniels on the rocks with JoAnne, she would not tell you that she was the first woman hired by Sports Illustrated. She wouldn’t tell you that she was the first woman at the Indianapolis 500 or the first female photographer in the NHL penalty box. And the list goes on and on and on. To be honest, when I think of JoAnne I never think of her in terms of a woman photographer, just one hell of a great photographer. If you want to have a really good time and see some great art, the DiMaggio/Kalish/ Wheeler “Crossing the Line” show opens at the White Gallery in Lakeville, CT. (http://www.thewhitegalleryart.com on Friday, July 29th and runs to September 7th with Artists’ reception on Saturday July 30th .

“JoAnne Kalish a professional photographer since the age of 18, JoAnne was the first woman photographer hired by “Sports Illustrated.” She was the only photographer at the Long Beach Grand Prix, who got the famous near shunt involving Mario Andretti and James Hunt at the start of the race. The photo was featured on the cover of SPORT ILLUSTRATED’sYear in Photos” and was used as a double page spread for the coffee-table book “Andretti.” JoAnne has worked for numerous national and international publications, as well as doing advertising and corporate work. Her specialties are portraiture, beauty and sensuality. She is most recently known for her iconic portrait of Artist Will Barnet which is now in the permanent collection of the National Gallery of Art’s portrait section in Washington D.C. Her work is featured in many private and public collections.”

 

 

© JoAnne Kalish

© JoAnne Kalish

© JoAnne Kalish

© JoAnne Kalish

© JoAnne Kalish

© JoAnne Kalish

© JoAnne Kalish

© JoAnne Kalish

Wheeler: In the Permanent Collection of the Museum of Modern Art

bio

Artist Dennis Wheeler

To all the ships at sea,

Anyone who know me knows that I have a basic philosophy in life: the greatest things in the life are free. They don’t cost anything. If you want to have an absolutely great time and see some wonderful art, the DiMaggio/Kalish/Wheeler “Crossing the Line” show opens at the White Gallery (http://www.thewhitegalleryart.com/) on Friday, July 29th and runs to September 7th with artists’ reception Saturday July 30th. Dennis Wheeler (http://denniswheelerart.com/bio/) has been a dear friend, teacher, and mentor of mine for a very long time. Hope to see you at the show.

“Dennis Wheeler’s experience in designing information stems from a varied career of award-winning Art and Creative Directorships.  In 1970, after several Art Director positions within Time Incorporated, he created the Corporate Creative Services Division, a department of five people responsible for delivering solutions for inter-corporate ad campaigns, exhibits, video presentations, identity programs and special advertising sections. During this period he also succeeded in producing designs for covers of Time, Fortune, and Life magazines.  13 of Wheeler’s 40 covers for Time are in the collection of the National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institute, Washington, D.C.  “The Sex Explosion”, July 11, 1969, is currently on view in an exhibit there called “Time Covers the 1960’s”.  Five of his posters for Life magazine are in the permanent collection of Design and Architecture, Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Upon creating his own company in 1972, many of Wheeler’s clients within Time Incorporated became his clients outside the company.  He was responsible for the entire identity and development of printed materials for Manhattan Cable Television, and the name, logo and two full “dummies” of Discover magazine. Transportation Displays Inc. retained him to supply a complete information display system for Logan International Airport, which was a factor in the widespread use of digital television in airports’ signage.

In 1980 Wheeler formed B&W Productions, as a subsidiary to his company, to create brand names and merchandising programs for mass marketers – JC Penney, Sears, and K-Mart.  Within two years, B&W Productions had created retail programs – Body Lingo and Ultimate in Sports Apparel  – which yielded nine-figure returns to the marketers.  The Education Utility, a joint venture between AT&T and the National Information Utility, provided an opportunity in 1987 to design his concept for “The Classroom of the Future” and present this work to the United States High School Superintendents Association.

In 1990, Wheeler began specializing in corporate identity programs, event identity programs, and new product development while also finding time to pursue his fine art activities.  A studio/gallery was opened on his property in Hillsdale, NY in 2006 where he now can implement designs he has been working on for several decades.”

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler