Looking Forward to a New Year

© White Gallery

© White Gallery

To all the ships at sea,

Well, all good things must come to an end. The Wheeler-Kalish-DiMaggio show at the White Gallery has come to an end. A great end, but an end nonetheless. From my vantage point, the ability to share a gallery with two amazing artists was a wonderful experience.  It was an awful lot of fun and extremely rewarding on many different levels with the two gallery owners, Tino and Susan, as well. Dennis, myself, and JoAnne, along with Tino and Susan, entered into this experiment with an open mind and like many things in my life and my career I came away learning something. Ninety-nine percent of the time it’s positivity, and in this particular case everything was positive. Great venue, show, people, support, and communication- what else could you ask for? To say nothing of the fact that all three of us artists had substantial sales of our work. I’m having a lunch tomorrow with Dennis and JoAnne and we are looking forward to our next show together. Life is good, sky is blue, the clouds are white. I continue to learn a little bit more about life everyday. So please pick up your cameras and go out and make some fine photos.

P.S. It’s free, and all the great things in life are free!

Hope to see you on the road,

Joe D.

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© Joe DiMaggio

© JoAnne Kalish

© JoAnne Kalish

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

White Gallery: The First Review Is In!

© JoAnne Kalish

© JoAnne Kalish

To all the ships at sea, take a look at our first review!

“From Commercial to Fine Art

 By Leon Graham

“Raindrop” is currently on display at The White Gallery. photo by Joe DiMaggio

“Crossing the Line,” now at The White Gallery in Lakeville, is a collection of work from three talented commercial photographers, good friends with award-winning credentials, who now make fine art  for their own pleasure. Throughout their careers they created images for magazine publishers, advertising agencies, major companies. Now they bring the same eye and originality to these very personal photographs.

Dennis Wheeler is best known for the many Time magazine covers he created. And created is the right word, because he made covers that were collages designed to grab attention on newsstands as well as comment on the cover subject in powerful ways. Four silhouetted male profiles — red, yellow, white, black — overlapped for a story on leadership in America. A cover on the sex explosion showed a young man and woman facing each other with much of their bodies covered by a giant fig leaf zippered down the middle.

At the White, Wheeler shows complex mixed media collages of carefully arranged objects, drawings, little photos, slashes of paint both long and short, all on brilliantly colored backgrounds.

“Pasture” stands out for its evocation of land and horses and the suggestion of fences. Made in browns and blues, the work is focused on a central black-and-white image of horses eating in a pasture. A gentle horse face peers at us from behind the pastured animals; there are small pictures of lakes too. All lie on swirls of thin, colored lines that suggest fencing wire.

JoAnne Kalish was the first woman photographer at Sports Illustrated. She is known for her ability to capture light and motion, as well as for the sensuality of many images. Her pictures of vegetables — two bell peppers at the White show — are luscious, rounded, inviting. Her pears are erotic and painterly. Even the two dogs meeting in “Venezia” seem about to begin a romance.

Kalish’s “Eiffel” is a pyramid of luminosity as if reflected in water. Her “Reflections” catches a small boat to the left tied up on a narrow canal, while buildings are reflected abstractly in the water on the right, which has the sheen of a mirror.

Kalish’s partner, Joe DiMaggio, is also a former Sports Illustrated and Time magazine photographer. (His and Kalisch’s images of professional hockey are now shown at the NHL Hall of Fame in Canada.) He worked for many advertising agencies, won many art direction awards. He is a master of suggesting motion in still photos. “Chevelle” shows a bright and shiny wheel cover that seems to be catching a passing landscape on its surface. In “Frankfurt,” a group of people are blurred so they appear in motion.

“Raindrop” catches a pearl of water as it is about to fall from the wide brim of a black cowboy hat that glistens from the moisture. We see only the nose and mouth of a man, who sports a marvelous neck bandana studded with white stars. “Infinity” is made of double yellow highway lines stretching into the distance between hazy trees and road shoulders that appear to converge up the road. It is wonderfully composed.

“Crossing the Line” continues at The White Gallery, 342 Main St. in Lakeville, Conn., through Sept. 9. The gallery is open Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 860-435-1029 or go to www.thewhitegalleryart.com.

 

“The Lakeville Journal, COMPASS,” August 4, 2016″

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

Wheeler 41A9786

© Dennis Wheeler

The Greatest Things In Life are Free

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© Joe DiMaggio

My partner and best friend JoAnne Kalish and I try to go to a new gallery at least twice a month and when we are in Manhattan we sometimes can visit three in a day. You’d be surprised what you can learn from looking at others’  art, regardless of the medium. There was an artist in Miami that had 500 prints of the same photograph in a stack. Not something that I would do, but it was very cool. Both JoAnne, myself, and  dear friend Dennis Wheeler have discovered a fabulous boutique gallery in Lakeville, Connecticut. The owner and curator, Tino Galluzzo, has not only a great eye but is an extremely well rounded, smart entrepreneur. As far as the free stuff goes, he’s got a fabulous smile as well! If you’re within 50 miles of the White Gallery in Lakeville, CT , I would like to cordially invite you to come see the show. When you walk in, you’ll understand why they call it the White Gallery- makes perfect sense to me.

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© Joe DiMaggio

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©JoAnne Kalish

To all the ships at sea: Welcome.

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© Joe DiMaggio

To all the ships at sea: Welcome. (You can figure out the morse code!)Learn-morse-code-alphabet

Kalish: In the Permanent Collection (Portrait Section) of the National Gallery of Art Washington D.C.

© Joe DiMaggio

To all the ships at sea,

JoAnne Kalish has an extremely small ego and a great talent. If you sipped a cup of tea, had a glass of Chardonnay, or had a Jack Daniels on the rocks with JoAnne, she would not tell you that she was the first woman hired by Sports Illustrated. She wouldn’t tell you that she was the first woman at the Indianapolis 500 or the first female photographer in the NHL penalty box. And the list goes on and on and on. To be honest, when I think of JoAnne I never think of her in terms of a woman photographer, just one hell of a great photographer. If you want to have a really good time and see some great art, the DiMaggio/Kalish/ Wheeler “Crossing the Line” show opens at the White Gallery in Lakeville, CT. (http://www.thewhitegalleryart.com on Friday, July 29th and runs to September 7th with Artists’ reception on Saturday July 30th .

“JoAnne Kalish a professional photographer since the age of 18, JoAnne was the first woman photographer hired by “Sports Illustrated.” She was the only photographer at the Long Beach Grand Prix, who got the famous near shunt involving Mario Andretti and James Hunt at the start of the race. The photo was featured on the cover of SPORT ILLUSTRATED’sYear in Photos” and was used as a double page spread for the coffee-table book “Andretti.” JoAnne has worked for numerous national and international publications, as well as doing advertising and corporate work. Her specialties are portraiture, beauty and sensuality. She is most recently known for her iconic portrait of Artist Will Barnet which is now in the permanent collection of the National Gallery of Art’s portrait section in Washington D.C. Her work is featured in many private and public collections.”

 

 

© JoAnne Kalish

© JoAnne Kalish

© JoAnne Kalish

© JoAnne Kalish

© JoAnne Kalish

© JoAnne Kalish

© JoAnne Kalish

© JoAnne Kalish

Wheeler: In the Permanent Collection of the Museum of Modern Art

bio

Artist Dennis Wheeler

To all the ships at sea,

Anyone who know me knows that I have a basic philosophy in life: the greatest things in the life are free. They don’t cost anything. If you want to have an absolutely great time and see some wonderful art, the DiMaggio/Kalish/Wheeler “Crossing the Line” show opens at the White Gallery (http://www.thewhitegalleryart.com/) on Friday, July 29th and runs to September 7th with artists’ reception Saturday July 30th. Dennis Wheeler (http://denniswheelerart.com/bio/) has been a dear friend, teacher, and mentor of mine for a very long time. Hope to see you at the show.

“Dennis Wheeler’s experience in designing information stems from a varied career of award-winning Art and Creative Directorships.  In 1970, after several Art Director positions within Time Incorporated, he created the Corporate Creative Services Division, a department of five people responsible for delivering solutions for inter-corporate ad campaigns, exhibits, video presentations, identity programs and special advertising sections. During this period he also succeeded in producing designs for covers of Time, Fortune, and Life magazines.  13 of Wheeler’s 40 covers for Time are in the collection of the National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institute, Washington, D.C.  “The Sex Explosion”, July 11, 1969, is currently on view in an exhibit there called “Time Covers the 1960’s”.  Five of his posters for Life magazine are in the permanent collection of Design and Architecture, Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Upon creating his own company in 1972, many of Wheeler’s clients within Time Incorporated became his clients outside the company.  He was responsible for the entire identity and development of printed materials for Manhattan Cable Television, and the name, logo and two full “dummies” of Discover magazine. Transportation Displays Inc. retained him to supply a complete information display system for Logan International Airport, which was a factor in the widespread use of digital television in airports’ signage.

In 1980 Wheeler formed B&W Productions, as a subsidiary to his company, to create brand names and merchandising programs for mass marketers – JC Penney, Sears, and K-Mart.  Within two years, B&W Productions had created retail programs – Body Lingo and Ultimate in Sports Apparel  – which yielded nine-figure returns to the marketers.  The Education Utility, a joint venture between AT&T and the National Information Utility, provided an opportunity in 1987 to design his concept for “The Classroom of the Future” and present this work to the United States High School Superintendents Association.

In 1990, Wheeler began specializing in corporate identity programs, event identity programs, and new product development while also finding time to pursue his fine art activities.  A studio/gallery was opened on his property in Hillsdale, NY in 2006 where he now can implement designs he has been working on for several decades.”

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

White Gallery Calendar Listing

To all the ships at sea,

Two of my all time favorite artists, Dennis Wheeler and JoAnne Kalish, are coming together with me to do a combined show at the White Gallery. Should be a great show, would love to see you there.

“Event Description: Is it commercial art or is it fine art? A question we hear often lately because of the convergence of art and technology. These three artists have all enjoyed successful careers in the publishing world as photographers and designers with both Sports Illustrated and Time Inc. That was then. What is now are three artists who utilize the same skill sets to create beautiful art. We hope you join us to see the art of Joe DiMaggio, Joanne Kalish, and Dennis Wheeler. The exhibition opens July 29th and runs thru September 7th with the artists’ reception July 30th from 5-7pm.”

The gallery can be found at 342 Main St., Lakeville, CT 06039 and the gallery’s webpage can be found at http://www.thewhitegalleryart.com/ .

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

Pears ©JoAnne Kalish 3043 72dpi e

© JoAnne Kalish

Phone Booth 2 ©DiMaggio 72 dpi 0388R e

© Joe DiMaggio

Art By Wheeler

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

Dennis Wheeler is one of the finest artists in America today. He has to his credit: his work is in the permanent collection in the Museum of Modern Art, and his artwork is in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington DC. When he talks about Andy, he’s not talking about Andy Rooney; he’s talking about Andy Warhol. He also has 40 Time covers to his credit. He’s one of the smartest and most creative people I’ve ever met. Extremely bright, creative, and quite humble. If you ever have an opportunity to be in Hillsdale, stop by his gallery. It’s absolutely awesome. And he makes a mean martini! How bad could it be?

Have a great day, Joe D signing off.

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

Will a Rainbow Put a Smile on Your Face?

Hi to All the Ships at Sea,

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

It’s a little known fact that JoAnne and I had an illegitimate son, by the name of Dylan (just joking.) Please understand across the studio just came a comment…”You’re out of your mind what are you saying?.” So let’s just be honest, I am out of my mind, I agree, it’s just the nature of the beast.  Dylan at a very young age had a babysitter, by the name of Dennis Wheeler.  Dennis’s art is in the permanent collection at the Museum of Modern Art. In my humble opinion he is one of the finest artists of our time. In those days we lived on the sea and rainbows were relatively commonplace. They usually happened after it rained…I never quite did figure that out. One day Dylan decided to paint rainbows. He painted, I don’t know, somewhere in the neighborhood of twenty different rainbows. I think JoAnne said to him one day, “Why don’t you sit outside on the stoop and maybe you can sell the rainbows to people who pass by.” (You can tell who the mercenary business person is in our small company) That’s why she is the brains and the beauty.

Dylan sat outside with the rainbows as people would come by and pick them up for 2 cents each.  The timing on this was approximately ten months after Musician Doug Stegmeyer went on to playing bass on a different plateau. There was a knock on the door and it was Peggy Stegmeyer, who lived down the street.  In her hand was one of Dylan’s rainbows. She very softly said, (I am paraphrasing) “Joe, this is the first time a smiled in almost a year.” I’ve been known to say, all the great things in the world are free and occasionally a great piece of art may only sell for 2 cents. But it made some one very happy.

All the Best,  Joe D

You can now follow me on Twitter @dimaggio_photo
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Ann, Don’t Forget to Call


Hi to all the Ships at Sea,

For anyone who didn’t know, Ann Raine was a great photographer, an absolute lovely human being, and a brilliant business women. She had the unique ability to adapt to any and all situations. Last Saturday she made an executive decision to take a long trip. There’s no doubt in my mind that everyone she touches on that trip will fall in love with her. We’ll still be able to talk to her – it’ll just be a slightly different conversation. It’s a little known fact that she was the first member of our Board of Directors – she of course, will continue to be on the Board. When we have our meetings, she will have a vote.

She paid me a compliment once and thanked me for everything that I taught her. In reality, she taught me more. Many of you including Dennis Wheeler, Hugh Brodie, Bobby Kyle, Brian Struble, Larry Malang, David Kenny, Linda Pederson, Dan Horton, Jeff Thomas, John Dryzga, Ralph Mocciola, Monica Cipnic, Dylan, JoAnne Kalish, Lourdes Merson and to be quite honest with you a few hundred others would like to wish you an amazing journey.

Keep that smile on your face and your camera close to your heart. Remember to open up 2 stops for back light.

Joe D & Ann Raine© Linda Pederson

All the Best,

Joe D

You can now follow me on Twitter @dimaggio_photo
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Wheeler The Great

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I’ve started many lectures, workshops, TV shows, radio shows, and magazine articles, with similar words; I’m the luckiest man in the world. My life is full of extremely creative, intelligent, and dynamic artists. One day it may be a blues musician; another day it may be a jazz man; the following week, a world class athlete; a retired boxer; or an author who has actually changed the world. This weekend, it was Dennis Wheeler; one of the finest artists in the United States today. Wheeler’s career has spanned six decades, he’s responsible for 45 Time Magazine covers, his work appears in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art, all of his children are extremely bright and creative, and he’s married to an adorable young lady named Kathi Doolan. Dennis was kind and generous enough to allow me to bring an elite group of advanced photographers to the Wheeler farm in Columbia County, New York. Unbeknownst to me, the timing could not have been perfect (Murphy had left the building). Wheeler, his son Dave, and Kathi launched the Atlantis for the Floatable piece of art. I believe, and I could be wrong, it is a 1/16,000 scale of a futuristic and green city of the future; right out of Buckminster Fuller. When built full size, it will be around 2,654 feet tall and house 30,000 people, with schools, shops, and a landing strip which will allow you to land and take off a 737. A dream; maybe. But sometimes dreams can become reality; remember Buck Rogers?

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Atlantis 4, full size will be 265 stories and 2,654 feet

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http://lindapedersenphotography.zenfolio.com/p405196090

To all the ships at sea, I will return to this blog and caption the photographs. The people in the photographs know who they are. I have to leave for Manhattan for a meeting, and will try to get back to it in a day or so. In my opinion, this was one great workshop.