Wheeler: In the Permanent Collection of the Museum of Modern Art

bio

Artist Dennis Wheeler

To all the ships at sea,

Anyone who know me knows that I have a basic philosophy in life: the greatest things in the life are free. They don’t cost anything. If you want to have an absolutely great time and see some wonderful art, the DiMaggio/Kalish/Wheeler “Crossing the Line” show opens at the White Gallery (http://www.thewhitegalleryart.com/) on Friday, July 29th and runs to September 7th with artists’ reception Saturday July 30th. Dennis Wheeler (http://denniswheelerart.com/bio/) has been a dear friend, teacher, and mentor of mine for a very long time. Hope to see you at the show.

“Dennis Wheeler’s experience in designing information stems from a varied career of award-winning Art and Creative Directorships.  In 1970, after several Art Director positions within Time Incorporated, he created the Corporate Creative Services Division, a department of five people responsible for delivering solutions for inter-corporate ad campaigns, exhibits, video presentations, identity programs and special advertising sections. During this period he also succeeded in producing designs for covers of Time, Fortune, and Life magazines.  13 of Wheeler’s 40 covers for Time are in the collection of the National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institute, Washington, D.C.  “The Sex Explosion”, July 11, 1969, is currently on view in an exhibit there called “Time Covers the 1960’s”.  Five of his posters for Life magazine are in the permanent collection of Design and Architecture, Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Upon creating his own company in 1972, many of Wheeler’s clients within Time Incorporated became his clients outside the company.  He was responsible for the entire identity and development of printed materials for Manhattan Cable Television, and the name, logo and two full “dummies” of Discover magazine. Transportation Displays Inc. retained him to supply a complete information display system for Logan International Airport, which was a factor in the widespread use of digital television in airports’ signage.

In 1980 Wheeler formed B&W Productions, as a subsidiary to his company, to create brand names and merchandising programs for mass marketers – JC Penney, Sears, and K-Mart.  Within two years, B&W Productions had created retail programs – Body Lingo and Ultimate in Sports Apparel  – which yielded nine-figure returns to the marketers.  The Education Utility, a joint venture between AT&T and the National Information Utility, provided an opportunity in 1987 to design his concept for “The Classroom of the Future” and present this work to the United States High School Superintendents Association.

In 1990, Wheeler began specializing in corporate identity programs, event identity programs, and new product development while also finding time to pursue his fine art activities.  A studio/gallery was opened on his property in Hillsdale, NY in 2006 where he now can implement designs he has been working on for several decades.”

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

White Gallery Calendar Listing

To all the ships at sea,

Two of my all time favorite artists, Dennis Wheeler and JoAnne Kalish, are coming together with me to do a combined show at the White Gallery. Should be a great show, would love to see you there.

“Event Description: Is it commercial art or is it fine art? A question we hear often lately because of the convergence of art and technology. These three artists have all enjoyed successful careers in the publishing world as photographers and designers with both Sports Illustrated and Time Inc. That was then. What is now are three artists who utilize the same skill sets to create beautiful art. We hope you join us to see the art of Joe DiMaggio, Joanne Kalish, and Dennis Wheeler. The exhibition opens July 29th and runs thru September 7th with the artists’ reception July 30th from 5-7pm.”

The gallery can be found at 342 Main St., Lakeville, CT 06039 and the gallery’s webpage can be found at http://www.thewhitegalleryart.com/ .

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

Pears ©JoAnne Kalish 3043 72dpi e

© JoAnne Kalish

Phone Booth 2 ©DiMaggio 72 dpi 0388R e

© Joe DiMaggio

Will Barnet: One Hundred and Five (I Wish)

Will Barnet Artist © JoAnne Kalish 576e

© JoAnne Kalish and self portrait Will Barnet

My partner, Joanne Kalish, received an assignment to do a portrait of Will Barnet. The first two sittings were canceled by Will. When JoAnne questioned the artist, he confided in her that he was not comfortable. Most great photographers know everything about shutter speed, aperture, sharpness- all of the things that are not that important in a photograph. JoAnne has the ability to make a total stranger comfortable and gets the best of the best.

They say the third time’s the charm. Will asked that there be no lighting, per se, and no assistant, pomp or ceremony. JoAnne went to Barnet’s studio armed with just one camera and two lenses and came away with the definitive greatest photograph that had ever been taken of Will Barnet. How do I know that? Will Barnet told JoAnne six months after the photo was taken that this was his all time favorite photo and the best photo ever taken of him. He’s not only been photographed by thousands of photographers but also at least fifty of the best photographers in the world.

Today would have been his 105th birthday. No photographer likes to take a backseat to another photographer. I love the photo so much that I actually purchased one from JoAnne and it hangs above my desk. We also now have a framed 40×60 called “Will Barnet at 100” that came from the National Academy Museum and School. Over the years, I’ve collected eight or nine pieces of Will Barnet’s art.

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JoAnne introduced me to Will and we had lunch and dinner together a few times. I have to say, he was one of the most amazing people that God put on this planet. At lunch one day we started to talk politics- not a good subject. I said, “What we need now is a new WPA (Works Project Administration)” and Will sipped his tea and said, “What a good idea, I headed the WPA as applicable to imagery.” I was sitting with a man who was at the forefront of the WPA.

WPA-USA-Sign

To all the ships at sea, I’d like to end this blog. One of the biggest thrills of my life was when Will Barnet looked at my portfolio. He looked at me and said, “You are not a photographer, you are a painter.” That will be one of the things I will always remember when I check into the darkroom in the sky.

Artist Will Barnet & Photographer JoAnne Kalish

Artist Will Barnet and Photographer JoAnne Kalish ©DiMaggio

 

Tri-X, Who Cares? I Do.

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© JoAnne Kalish (alias JFK) All Rights Reserved

Long ago and far away, there was something called “film.” Film was invented in Europe by a young man Eadweard Muybridge. The still image evolved from motion picture film, on or about the 1890’s. I remember it vividly because I was shooting Nikon at the time. Okay before you run to Google, I’m only 29 years old. One of my favorite films was “Tri-X”, which was introduced in 1954. I personally shot at ASA 800 and loved to process it at  D76, one to one at 400, which would yield a #2 negative which would print on #2 paper. One of my favorite photographers was JoAnne Francis Kalish, JFK for short. Here’s a photo she did at Jones Beach with a gorgeous model- my god, he had hair. I’m pretty sure she used a Nikon camera with a 20mm lens. You won’t find it on Facebook, you won’t find it on Instagram… but maybe we’ll tweet it. Life was simple. Three trays and hang on. JFK went on to be the first woman to be hired by Sports Illustrated, the first woman at the Indy 500, the first woman at the National Hockey League, the first woman to be inducted in the Hockey Hall of Fame (not as a forward). One hell of a great photographer (P.S. She still is.) To all the ships at sea, there’s an awful lot of color in black and white. See you on the road, Joe D.

Happy Birthday Gerry

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe DiMaggio

To all the ships at sea, 

I would like to share a little story about my 35th birthday.  Gerry Cooney showed up at my studio and delivered a beautiful birthday gift.  The box was unbelievably light, but it was wrapped beautifully, it had a beautiful card. I opened it up, and it was a black negligee, size petit.  I said, “Gerry, I’ll never fit in this.”  He said, “you’ll figure out something to do with it.”  So Gerry, happy 29th birthday… oops, I mean 39th birthday, oops.  You’ll always be forever young.  In writing my memoirs, I have four chapters on Gerry Cooney, my publisher is insisting I get them down to one reasonably large chapter, which I will do.

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe DiMaggio

©JoeDiMaggio

©JoAnne Kalish                                                      One point low blow.

 

Gerry Cooney

To all the ships at sea,

As the line goes, “Where have you gone Joe DiMaggio?”  Well, the short answer to that is, as my friend Willy Nelson would say is, “On the road again.”  Haven’t had any time to do any blogging, tweeting, or social media, and if I did have time for that, I was probably having a martini, and once I have a martini, I don’t feel like blogging.  Guess what… I haven’t had a martini yet today.  Let me share one of my old friends with you.  Gentleman Gerry Cooney, the number one heavy weight champion a few years back. He’s not only one of the sweetest men God put on this Earth, but his love of his fellow man and especially children is amazing.  He’s dedicated himself to YCS which is an organization that takes care of the children that have been neglected by everybody.  They’re success rate is totally astounding.   Great people going great work, and making great children into great men and women.  It’s truly a beautiful thing.  If we all lived our lives that way, this truly would be a paradise.

Each day YCS cares for approximately 1,500 children, by providing either residential care or in-community and in-home services. Some of the children are separated from their loved ones and have been affected by trauma, others are unable to live at home because of intellectual and developmental disabilities that adversely affect their behavior. Whatever the child’s special education, mental health or behavioral health needs, the caring YCS staff is prepared to offer individualized services to both the child and family. With your support, we can help our children find hope, and cultivate strength and resilience for a brighter future.

http://www.ycs.org/

 

©JoeDiMaggio

©JoeDiMaggio

Cooney and Kalish, getting ready to rumble.

Yukiko and Tom

©YukikoLaunois

© Tom  Sobolik & YukikoLaunois

To all the ships at sea,

Both JoAnne and I absolutely love going to any art gallery, museum, or photo show.  If you allow your mind to open up to new ideas, it can be a tremendous inspiration to your own work.  We were invited to the opening of Yukiko’s work in Westchester county at the Martin Stankiewicz gallery.  I have to tell you it was a fabulous show.  Both photographers, diametrically opposite in style, but tremendous talents.  To say nothing of the Prosecco, that was very dry, and that’s me trying to be funny.  Over my X number of decades in photography, Yukiko was probably my favorite editor, and definitely the toughest.  When Yukiko gave me an idea, or a critique, I listened, and I executed on her recommendation, and then of coarse, I did it my way, the combination was extremely successful for both of us.  Life is good.  I purchased one of her pieces that was typical Asian composition (I studied art in Japan, less is more).  Yukiko’s work is so strong and minimalistic.  If you have the opportunity, see her show, it’s worth the ride.  If not, she’s having a gallery show in Manhattan, more to follow.  I would be remise if I didn’t say that Tom is a fabulous photographer. He’s been across the block quite a bit and he’s taken his Black Star routes and added a fine art twist.  Excellent photographer.  It’s all good.

 

Artists’s Statement: Tom Sobolik

This exhibit is the result of artistic larceny.  The exhibit also grew out of the 34-year photography friendship between Yukiko Launois and me.  We met in1980 when Yukiko was head of the photo library at the Black Star photo agency and I, a fledgling photojournalist, went to work for her.  After a career as a photo editor for Black Star and Corbis, Yukiko became  a photographer herself in retirement.  My career was a photojournalist and a corporate photographer through Black Star.  About 10 years ago I began switching my emphasis to landscape photography.

I was inspired to winter scenes by Yukiko occasionally sent of snow in Central Park.  Photographing purely for her own enjoyment, she would “publish” them by home-making greeting cards and sending them to friends.  I loved the photos and was drawn to the harmony, simplicity and grace in them juxtaposed to the stark contrasts and harshness of winter.

Without knowing the Picasso quote, “Bad artists copy.  Good artists steal”, I began unconsciously pilfering the sensibilities I drew from my friends photos.  After seeing the early results I became much more aware of Yukiko’s influence on my winter work and I began unabashedly helping myself to all I could of her vision.  This show is some of the evidence of that thievery.  It is a collaboration because Yukiko is complicit in my embezzlement.

 

Artist’s statement: Yukiko Launois

I am first and foremost a photography editor.  That was my career and I never took a photograph myself until after my retirement 10 years ago.  Then I began editing the real world and putting my choice on film.  I am an observer of nature and I try to choose the purest beauty in it.

My idea of beauty is influenced by my upbringing in Japan.  As a girl I learned classical Japanese arts including calligraphy and flower arranging.  I rebelled against the classics and fell in love and married a French/American photojournalist, moving to New York.  But Japanese aesthetics remained in my DNA.

Taking photographs is my pleasure.  I do it for my own enjoyment and could never have seen myself as one of the many world-renowned photojournalists whose work I edited for Black Star and Corbis.  Pressure and deadlines are not for me.

Even so, when I am happy with a photograph I like to share it.  So I make note cards with my favorite images and send them to friends.

I was flattered when Tom asked me to do a joint show.  I was blown away when I saw some of his snow pictures.  His less-is-more kind of approach looked very Japanese to me.  I didn’t know I inspired him to do the work but my old editing instincts told me our photos would look good together.

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Yukiko Launois and JoAnne Kalish ©JoeDiMaggio

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Yukiko Launois ©JoeDiMaggio

 

©JoeDiMaggio

Tom Sobolik ©JoeDiMaggio

Yukiko Launois ©JoeDiMaggio

 

©JoeDiMaggio

 

 

Cuba: Through a Photographers Lens – The Photographers

 

Cuba © Joe  DiMaggio-3975 e

© Joe DiMaggio

Cuba: Through a Photographers Lens with Joe DiMaggio and JoAnne Kalish. The last time I was in Cuba, Bill Clinton was President of the United States. The last thing that I want to

do is talk politics. For the last fifty plus years we’ve maintained an embargo on Cuba. If you’d like to know my personal view, give me a call.

It seemed in the attached photos that every time we had someone taking a group photo of us, we were eating or drinking our way through Cuba – but this was hardly half of it and not true. We had an extraordinary group who knew their photography and were very aware of our history and the culture of Cuba as well. We met and spent time with many wonderful Cuban people. We left with concerns about our new friends on that beautiful Island ninety miles off of our shore.

There are no excuses, as I still have not done a reasonable edit on my personal photographs.  I hope to have them done before November 17 as JoAnne and I will be leading another People to Exchange to Cuba from Miami.  We are close to to filling this trip up, so please keep in mind that if you’d like to join us – please let us know as soon as possible. Some of these photos I posted are obviously not all mine.

I’d like to thank all the photographers who joined us and all the wonderful Cuban people that made it such a very special trip. Also thanks to the people behind the scenes as well who worked diligently to make it work smoothly and as successfully as our trip did.

© Joe  DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

Cuba John Huntington 4434e

© Joe DiMaggio

 

Cuba © Joe  DiMaggio-4532 e

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe  DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

 

© Joe  DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe  DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

 

© Joe  DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

 

© Joe  DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

 

A People to People Photo Exchange: Cuba from Miami January 14-21, 2014

The-Malecon-Havana-Cuba R

Cuba from a Photographers’ Lens:

A People to People Photo Expedition:
Cuba from Miami January 14 to 21, 2014 with the Center for Cuban Studies, Photographers Joe DiMaggio & JoAnne Kalish and in Cuba, Photographer Rolando Pujól
Please contact me for additional information.

Art It’s All About the Art

Peter Fiore and Phil Rachelson

Peter Fiore and Phil Rachelson

  • Both JoAnne and myself have been extremely lucky over the years.  We have many artist friends, some play the blues, others play jazz, some work in pen and ink, oil, watercolor, photography, some are illustrators, some are poets,others are authors and the list goes on…Over the years we’ve been to many gallery openings all over the world. Last night we had an opportunity to go to Phil Rachelson’s  The Forge Gallery in Milford, PA. It was like walking into a high end New York City Gallery and studio. The space was amazing. To make it better there were three artist showing there – a father – Peter Fiore, a son Paul Fiore and daughter Lisa Fiore each with their own distinct style. It was obvious in the DNA that they were all accomplished and had a passion for their work. Talking about DNA, I left out the matriarch of the family Barbara Fiore is also an artist as well and works with ceramic sculpture.
  • To All the Ships at Sea, if you’re anywhere near the Upper Delaware stop by and visit Phil at The Forge Gallery – you won’t be disappointed.
Paul Fiore and friend

Paul Fiore and friend

Son-Daughter-Father Show at the Forgee

Amy Bridge Publisher and Editor of Milford Journal, JoAnne Kalish & Eileen Rachelson

Amy Bridge Publisher and Editor of Milford Journal, JoAnne Kalish & Eileen Rachelson

Eileen and Phil Rachelson

Eileen and Phil Rachelson

Son-Daughter-Fathere