“New Photography” on Saatchi Art

There is a rumor out there that my very dear friend and partner are married. I’m not going to comment on that, it is just not my place. When I think of JoAnne, I never think of her as a woman photographer. I think of her as a great photographer. She has a huge talent and a very small ego. I doubt she would put this on her blog but I am going to put it on my blog.

JoAnne was featured on Saatchi Art with one of her iconic photographs.

On behalf of chief curator Rebecca Wilson and the Saatchi Art curation team, I’m very pleased to let you know that your work has been chosen to be featured in the New Photography Collection on Saatchi Art’s homepage. You can see the collection here: http://www.saatchiart.com/art-collection/Photography/New-Photography/722504/148747/view  “

Fanny and Pear ©JoAnne Kalish 72 dpi R e

© JoAnne Kalish

My Saatchi art account can be found through http://www.saatchiart.com/joedimaggio and JoAnne’s can be found through http://www.saatchiart.com/Whatssheupto.

 

The Greatest Things In Life are Free

_ White Gallery DSC3442

© Joe DiMaggio

My partner and best friend JoAnne Kalish and I try to go to a new gallery at least twice a month and when we are in Manhattan we sometimes can visit three in a day. You’d be surprised what you can learn from looking at others’  art, regardless of the medium. There was an artist in Miami that had 500 prints of the same photograph in a stack. Not something that I would do, but it was very cool. Both JoAnne, myself, and  dear friend Dennis Wheeler have discovered a fabulous boutique gallery in Lakeville, Connecticut. The owner and curator, Tino Galluzzo, has not only a great eye but is an extremely well rounded, smart entrepreneur. As far as the free stuff goes, he’s got a fabulous smile as well! If you’re within 50 miles of the White Gallery in Lakeville, CT , I would like to cordially invite you to come see the show. When you walk in, you’ll understand why they call it the White Gallery- makes perfect sense to me.

_White Gallery DSC3457 e

© Joe DiMaggio

White Gallery DSC3460 jd

©JoAnne Kalish

To all the ships at sea: Welcome.

White Gallery DSC3462 window

© Joe DiMaggio

To all the ships at sea: Welcome. (You can figure out the morse code!)Learn-morse-code-alphabet

Good News, Bad News

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

To all the boxing fans and ships at sea,

The good news is this was voted one of the most dynamic boxing photos of all times. Sport Illustrated cover, Time Magazine photo of the year. Bad news? Every boxing photo taken after that had to exceed it. Not so easy. Right place, right time, right light, right exposure, right angle; twenty plus years of experience and a little bit of luck, too. Of course, my dear friend Gerry Cooney hates the photo. The first time he walked into my studio, he walked over past me without saying a word, stood in front of the photo, shook his head and said a few words in Gaelic which I can’t repeat. I said, “Gerry, ___ happens. You never see it coming.” He said, “You are an ____ hole.” I saw that one coming. I looked back at him and said, “Then why didn’t you duck?” We obviously never talk about the photo. Attached you will find a short film on Gerry, you may find it answers a few questions.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g2ch7NQ5n_o&sns=em

Kalish: In the Permanent Collection (Portrait Section) of the National Gallery of Art Washington D.C.

© Joe DiMaggio

To all the ships at sea,

JoAnne Kalish has an extremely small ego and a great talent. If you sipped a cup of tea, had a glass of Chardonnay, or had a Jack Daniels on the rocks with JoAnne, she would not tell you that she was the first woman hired by Sports Illustrated. She wouldn’t tell you that she was the first woman at the Indianapolis 500 or the first female photographer in the NHL penalty box. And the list goes on and on and on. To be honest, when I think of JoAnne I never think of her in terms of a woman photographer, just one hell of a great photographer. If you want to have a really good time and see some great art, the DiMaggio/Kalish/ Wheeler “Crossing the Line” show opens at the White Gallery in Lakeville, CT. (http://www.thewhitegalleryart.com on Friday, July 29th and runs to September 7th with Artists’ reception on Saturday July 30th .

“JoAnne Kalish a professional photographer since the age of 18, JoAnne was the first woman photographer hired by “Sports Illustrated.” She was the only photographer at the Long Beach Grand Prix, who got the famous near shunt involving Mario Andretti and James Hunt at the start of the race. The photo was featured on the cover of SPORT ILLUSTRATED’sYear in Photos” and was used as a double page spread for the coffee-table book “Andretti.” JoAnne has worked for numerous national and international publications, as well as doing advertising and corporate work. Her specialties are portraiture, beauty and sensuality. She is most recently known for her iconic portrait of Artist Will Barnet which is now in the permanent collection of the National Gallery of Art’s portrait section in Washington D.C. Her work is featured in many private and public collections.”

 

 

© JoAnne Kalish

© JoAnne Kalish

© JoAnne Kalish

© JoAnne Kalish

© JoAnne Kalish

© JoAnne Kalish

© JoAnne Kalish

© JoAnne Kalish

Wheeler: In the Permanent Collection of the Museum of Modern Art

bio

Artist Dennis Wheeler

To all the ships at sea,

Anyone who know me knows that I have a basic philosophy in life: the greatest things in the life are free. They don’t cost anything. If you want to have an absolutely great time and see some wonderful art, the DiMaggio/Kalish/Wheeler “Crossing the Line” show opens at the White Gallery (http://www.thewhitegalleryart.com/) on Friday, July 29th and runs to September 7th with artists’ reception Saturday July 30th. Dennis Wheeler (http://denniswheelerart.com/bio/) has been a dear friend, teacher, and mentor of mine for a very long time. Hope to see you at the show.

“Dennis Wheeler’s experience in designing information stems from a varied career of award-winning Art and Creative Directorships.  In 1970, after several Art Director positions within Time Incorporated, he created the Corporate Creative Services Division, a department of five people responsible for delivering solutions for inter-corporate ad campaigns, exhibits, video presentations, identity programs and special advertising sections. During this period he also succeeded in producing designs for covers of Time, Fortune, and Life magazines.  13 of Wheeler’s 40 covers for Time are in the collection of the National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institute, Washington, D.C.  “The Sex Explosion”, July 11, 1969, is currently on view in an exhibit there called “Time Covers the 1960’s”.  Five of his posters for Life magazine are in the permanent collection of Design and Architecture, Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Upon creating his own company in 1972, many of Wheeler’s clients within Time Incorporated became his clients outside the company.  He was responsible for the entire identity and development of printed materials for Manhattan Cable Television, and the name, logo and two full “dummies” of Discover magazine. Transportation Displays Inc. retained him to supply a complete information display system for Logan International Airport, which was a factor in the widespread use of digital television in airports’ signage.

In 1980 Wheeler formed B&W Productions, as a subsidiary to his company, to create brand names and merchandising programs for mass marketers – JC Penney, Sears, and K-Mart.  Within two years, B&W Productions had created retail programs – Body Lingo and Ultimate in Sports Apparel  – which yielded nine-figure returns to the marketers.  The Education Utility, a joint venture between AT&T and the National Information Utility, provided an opportunity in 1987 to design his concept for “The Classroom of the Future” and present this work to the United States High School Superintendents Association.

In 1990, Wheeler began specializing in corporate identity programs, event identity programs, and new product development while also finding time to pursue his fine art activities.  A studio/gallery was opened on his property in Hillsdale, NY in 2006 where he now can implement designs he has been working on for several decades.”

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

White Gallery Calendar Listing

To all the ships at sea,

Two of my all time favorite artists, Dennis Wheeler and JoAnne Kalish, are coming together with me to do a combined show at the White Gallery. Should be a great show, would love to see you there.

“Event Description: Is it commercial art or is it fine art? A question we hear often lately because of the convergence of art and technology. These three artists have all enjoyed successful careers in the publishing world as photographers and designers with both Sports Illustrated and Time Inc. That was then. What is now are three artists who utilize the same skill sets to create beautiful art. We hope you join us to see the art of Joe DiMaggio, Joanne Kalish, and Dennis Wheeler. The exhibition opens July 29th and runs thru September 7th with the artists’ reception July 30th from 5-7pm.”

The gallery can be found at 342 Main St., Lakeville, CT 06039 and the gallery’s webpage can be found at http://www.thewhitegalleryart.com/ .

© Dennis Wheeler

© Dennis Wheeler

Pears ©JoAnne Kalish 3043 72dpi e

© JoAnne Kalish

Phone Booth 2 ©DiMaggio 72 dpi 0388R e

© Joe DiMaggio

“Snap-o’-the-Day”

© Sam Garcia

© Sam Garcia

To all the ships at sea, there’s an old cliche : Honesty is the best policy. My doctor suggested that I get a hobby to try and minimize the stress and pressure in my life. What I’ve done is I have hired Sam Garcia on a six-month trial basis to lighten up my life. He is one of the very few people that can make me laugh. He sends the “snap-o’-the-day” to a very close circle of friends and photographers. Hmm… friends, or photographers? Not sure about that. I read this email this morning at 2:45 AM and at the end all I could think of was the old adage, “A picture is worth a thousand words.”

“(this edition of snap-o’-the-day includes an overview of the picture setting, the site, some dawn-of-aviation info, and is kind of a walk through the woods. If you’re not interested there’s no reason you have to do anything other than look at this top photo, and then hit ‘Delete’ as usual. The rest is merely exposition… I won’t be offended if you skip it.)

3.L1020297 SOTD

I was a bit surprised myself last night when the light in the street corner of my apt started to look so interesting I had to make a shot or two.

I suppose I shouldn’t have been.

Ever since the hurricane two years ago damaged the outside roof and leaked into my apartment, requiring the entire wall surface to be replaced and repainted, the light over in that corner has really changed. (No, not this corner. Over there…, yeah, that one…)

Except for the fact most folk would be horrified by my dark cell of a ‘home’, I’d love to start bringing people in here to photograph, I so like the way light now affects the wall and that corner much of the day, but often most dramatically as the sunset light slices or slithers into the room, depending on the time of the year.

It’s kind of a North/East-ish exposure. I wish the window were twice as large, but it is what it is in this rattletrap place, carved out of the second floor of an over 130 year old building, which has always been a public bar or restaurant on the ground floor.

1. lower Main St., Port Washington, NY

2.home

(on my refrigerator door)

ANYway…

Not a bad snap of a nice Polish crystal vase I bought years ago and use to hold my change.

It’s really more a snapshot than it (I hope) looks.

I did place it there ‘artificially’, in order to make the shot. I was curious to see what the glass shape did with the curtained light.

But other than wiping off fingerprints (rather casually, I’m afraid…I’m not the obsessive compulsive studio control freak I’d like to be, so as to glean some of the big bucks those guys can make in one of the last genuinely lucrative aspects of the business) I really just took the picture.

So it really looked like that.

But, of course it didn’t at the same time.

I know what the meter ‘sees’ vs what I want to gather in the frame, so I adjusted accordingly. In this case, dialing in about two stops of underexposure. And the vase disappears into a design of light.

Although I made a couple of various snaps with three different cameras (the object originally sitting on the top of this box, which rests on the nightstand besides my mattress-on-a-metal-frame [I’d hardly call it a ‘bed’] which caught my attention was my glasses) this photograph of the vase was made on a Leica SL, with their 24-90mm zoom probably nearer the long end.

I was jammed into the wall, scrunching up pillows between my poor head and the wall surface. (That, unfortunately, being the angle where the light was nice.)

Photography rule: the light is virtually NEVER nice from an angle which allows shooting from a comfortable, seated position.

Let’s see…, what else? Oh, yeah…sorry…, obviously decided to shoot it in black and white. 

Starting with the Nikon Coolpix P7000, up to the D600, the D4, then the D800E, followed by the Leica Q, and now their professional mirrorless body, the wildly frustrating and excellent SL, I’ve shot more black and white in the last few years than in the first thirty years in photography, because NOW shooting black and white is a delight when you can PREVIEW it in the finder and then see the results on the screen. Nirvana for b&w folk. Many cameras shoot b&w, the ones I just listed seem to do a much better than average job for the way I like it to look. (I should add, I’m not as fond of Fuji’s black and white file as others seem to be. It’s EXCELLENT, but it’s just not for me. This is all REALLY personal preference stuff, not science. I like a sharper, more contrasting black to white, whereas some photogs like a longer tonal range. For me, the Nikon’s P7000 and D800E, and the Leica Q just nail it brilliantly.)

I don’t convert to b&w from a color file. Seeing it all later on a computer is useless to what I want to do.

Oh, I mentioned it’s real, but not real. Well, like Life, it’s just in how you interpret I suppose.

Since I decided to ramble on about the apartment light I made one additional snap, just for you. Here’s the way most cameras on full automatic or program would have seen the same subject in the light as it existed. And I widened the shot to show you can pull clean design out of visual clutter.

4.real

And…

No…

that pretty much covers it.

S.”

But of course, because of the stress, at 2:30 I meant to send this reply to Sam but accidentally sent it to Samy of Samy’s Cameras. I MAY have to cancel my subscription  to GarciaJokes.com!

Hi Joe,

I hope all is well with you.

Did you mean to send this to me or did you want to send it to Samy?

Samy’s email is samy@samys.com.

many thanks,

Karen”

My reply:

Hi Sam,

I guess I missed the class on multiples at Nikon School.  I was out generating National Ads and award winning editorial photography.

There was no reason to send that particular photo to you other than Getty selected it.  One thing I will share with you that many fine photographers have forgotten.  One of the reasons most photographers get involved in photography is because they love it and want to have fun.  I’ve spent the last 4 decades breaking teeth, breaking my back trying desperately to make my clients happy and make a reasonable livelihood.  I’ve chosen to spend the balance of my days left on the planet having fun and learning how to become an amateur photographer.  Let’s call it full circle.

Have a fabulous, great, happy day.

Joe D”

©Joe DiMaggio - Please find Sam!

©Joe DiMaggio – Please find Sam Garcia!

Priceless Employee Keeps A Great Company Great

Sunset Winter lake 5G0A01302

© Joe DiMaggio All Rights Reserved

To all the ships at sea, you have heard me repeatedly say, “Life is moving at light speed.” A Bob Dylan lyric goes, “I’m running as fast as I can and I’m still moving backwards.” One of the easiest things in the world to do is to critique somebody, criticize somebody, and, excuse the expression, “bitch” or “slap” somebody – physically or mentally. In reality, none of those things are acceptable. So, exactly what is the definition of a “hypocrite”? Let’s hope Webster’s unabashed dictionary doesn’t say, “see: Joe DiMaggio.” Well, let’s get on with this blog.

Monday mornings before nine o’clock tend to be ominous. I tend to get into the studio around five or six. It’s like a prize fighter, waiting for the bell to go off- the nine o’clock bell on the east coast and the six o’clock bell on the west coast (that means you can’t call them until about one o’clock in the afternoon.)

Well it’s Monday morning, 8:20 to be exact, and I decide to take the dice out of my pocket and roll them on the floor to see what comes up; I decided to call a company that I’d never had an opportunity to talk with, and the name of that company is Herman Miller. On or about close to fifteen years ago I bought two Herman Miller chairs, one for my partner, JoAnne Kalish, and one for myself. Suffice it to say, they are the best chairs you can buy for your office, studio, computer- hell, anywhere. They are the Rolls Royce of office chairs. As we all know, especially my dear friend and Rolls Royce owner Lew Long, along with that badge usually comes some high maintenance. It just goes with the territory. That’s why my BMW mechanic always smiles when he sees me.

It’s now 8:21 and a young lady by the name of Stacy Holman answers the phone with a beautiful, warm, loving smile that comes across my cellphone. I explain to Stacy that I’m not exactly what you would call a “lightweight” and that the chair was making a few clicks (keeping in mind it was still working pretty darn good. Actually, it was working damn good.) She asked me to turn the chair upside down and give her the product number, the date the chair was conceived, etc., etc. She then informed me that unfortunately, the chair was out of warranty, but she gave me five locations I could bring it to for repair. Then Stacy did something that was totally and absolutely amazing. She made an executive decision; as a sign of good faith with a great company and a great product, she would extend a one time only repair (rebuild) like new for my Herman Miller chair. It’s now 8:27 and, suffice it to say, I am blown away. She explained the protocol in plain English (so that even I could understand it) and followed it up with not one but two emails, telling me exactly what would happen, where it would happen, etc., etc. I said to Stacy, “Have you ever heard the expression, ‘You made my day?'” And with the lovely smile on her face she said, “Yes I have.” I said, “I think you made my day, week, month and possibly all of 2016 with your honesty, enthusiasm, product knowledge, and your overall positive demeanor.” I asked for her email; she not only gave me her email but her phone number. I wrote a short, hopefully beautiful letter in hopes that her supervisor would understand that she, as the face of a great corporation, did everything necessary to satisfy a client. If all of us, including myself, went to school on how Stacy comports herself, this would be one hell of a great universe for everybody. She taught me a valuable lesson which I will not forget- thank you, Stacy. As Ralph Kramden would say, “You’re the greatest.” (Yes Stacy, I know you probably don’t know who Ralph Kramden is.)

P.S. 1. Phone call. 2. Email. 3. Box delivered. 4. Box chair picked up. 5. Returned. 6. Returned to me in new condition. Doesn’t get better than that.

P.P.S. Maybe the United States Congress should take a lesson from Stacy on how to get things done properly.

350 cannon569350 cannon570 350 cannon571

Hockey’s Greatest Photos

 

©Bruce Bennett

©Bruce Bennett

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

©Bruce Bennett

©Bruce Bennett

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To all the ships at sea,

Honesty is the best policy.  Most photographers can range from good, to mediocre, to fine, to great, to super.  Regardless of whether they’re an amateur, a pro, an advanced whatever, they all seem to have one thing in common, they aren’t good businessmen.  Neil Leifer, Jay Mizell, Pete Turner, great photographers, great businessmen.  Which leads me to a book with a very modest name, Hockey’s Greatest Photos, by Bruce Bennett.  Before seeing the book, and just hearing the name, I think I said four wow’s.  The book arrived on my doorstep today, and you know what, they may not be all the greatest hockey photos, but there’s a whole lot of great photos in this book.  If you’re a hockey aficionado, if you’re a hockey player, if you’re from Canada, Boston New York, anywhere theres an NHL team, you must own this book.  Bruce, are you really going to give me $2 a  book for endorsement?  That’s me trying to be funny.  If anyone knows Bruce, he’s not giving anyone any money, that’s also me trying to be funny.  Bruce, I take my beret off to you.  Are you the same Bruce Bennett that use to assist me?  Hm… I wonder…  Well, I’ll leave you with this, there’s an old Italian saying, “Mazel Tov, You’re a real mensch.”

 

                                                           The Hockey News

                   Hockey’s Greatest Photos The Bruce Bennett Collection

                             Forewords by Wayne Gretzky & Martin Brodeur

The Hockey News’ latest book, Hockey’s Greatest Photos: The Bruce Bennett Collection, is the perfect pickup for the diehard hockey fan. As the “Wayne Gretzky of hockey photography,” Bruce Bennett is known as the best in the business, and he has put together the definitive collection of the game’s best photos from his 40-plus years shooting hockey.

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then Hockey’s Greatest Photos is a 250,000-word epic. In it, Bennett reveals 250 of his best photos taken from an archive that runs to more than two million images shot over his four decades in hockey. He captures it all: competition, camaraderie, iconic moments, amazing goals, sizzling saves, bone-crushing hits, and off-ice hilarity. He covers every emotion associated with the game, from the ecstasy of victory to the agony of defeat, and he does so from every conceivable angle. Whether on the ice, from the corner, in the stands, behind the bench, beside the penalty box, inside the net or in the dressing room, Hockey’s Greatest Photos immortalizes the essence of the game.

About The Photographer:

For 40 years Bruce Bennett has covered hockey. Bruce shot his first Stanley Cup final in Philadelphia in 1976 as the Montreal Canadiens defeated the Flyers. Since then, he has covered 35 Cup finals, 26 All-Star Games, more than 375 international games including four Winter Olympics, and more than 4,500 NHL games. In addition, Bruce has been the team photographer for several Stanley Cup winning teams including the New York Islanders, New Jersey Devils, and New York Rangers. Bruce’s company Bruce Bennett Studios (BBS) and its archive of two million hockey images was acquired by Getty Images in 2004, and Bruce joined the company as a staff photographer.

About the Book:

Hockey’s Greatest Photos: The Bruce Bennett Collection

By The Hockey News

Photographs by Bruce Bennett

Forewords by Wayne Gretzky & Martin Brodeur

On-sale October 6th, 2015

The Hockey News

ISBN: 9781988002125  $39.95 CAN $34.95 US

eBook ISBN: 9781476782522 $15.99 $12.99

For media inquiries or requests for promotional images please contact Katie.callaghan@simonandschuster.ca.

www.simonandschuster.ca

 

 

 

I think I used to shoot hockey in the day…

 

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe DiMaggio