Kodachrome

© Joe DiMaggio

To all the Ships at Sea –

Coming up to the 20th anniversary of digital (for me.) While researching a new book I came across this Kodachrome 64 slide of Tom Seaver.  It stopped me in my tracks.  Wow! Talk about butter!   Never to be seen again!

 

Great Yellow Father

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

To all the ships at sea,

The majority of photographers I’ve come to know over the years were weaned on TriX, Plus X, Panatomic X, Kodacrome 1,2, 25, 64, and High Speed Ektachrome. I affectionally called Kodak “The Great Yellow Father.” Well, the last time I did a lecture at RIT about eight years ago I stopped by to see a Vice President of Kodak who is a friend of mine. While walking to his office I could hear the echo of my footsteps. The handwriting had been on the wall for at least 5-8 years prior to that, lets call it 1999. And one of the final indications was when Dano Steinhardt left Kodak for Epson. I know Dano loved Kodak. He had to do what was right for him and for his family. Covering the heavyweight championship fight in Rochester, killing six hours, I looked up to see the Kodak tower. It was sad. One of the security people told me they were going to convert it to a community college. There is no doubt that George Eastman is doing cartwheels in his grave. One of the oldest most powerful and greatest longest lasting corporations in america. Very sad, very sad. I’m looking above me three computers, theres a roll of Kodacrome 200, 25 and Ektachrome X. I don’t why I have it, but it’s there.

IMG_0854

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

Tomcat

Hi to All the Ships at Sea,

Talk to any fighter pilot from any era and they’ll tell you the only two planes that matter are P51 Mustang (propeller plane) and the F14 tomcat jet plane. TIME Magazine sent me on an assignment to photograph the last F14 to come off the assembly in Grumman. Suffice it to say it was very prestigious. Like all my assignments I always try to go a little bit further. So I got permission from the commanding officer to mount two cameras in the back with the weapons control officer.  I used a NikonF with motor drive and 15mm lens, Kodachrome 64. at 1/250 at f/8. In a couple weeks you’ll see another P51 blog and see how many G’s I can go through.

All the best,

Joe D

You can now follow me on Twitter @dimaggio_photo
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One of the Greatest Bass Guitar Players of All Time

Hi to all the Ships at Sea,

Sometimes we do not appreciate a particular photograph on a particular day. I would like to think that every photograph taken by everybody (not just me) is extremely important in that particular moment in history. Unfortunately, sometimes that moment becomes blurred or it’s forgotten…for whatever reason.  My day started out as an “off” day, until a close friend and neighbor knocked on my door and said he needed to set up a shoot. His name was Doug Stegmeyer. Doug’s mom lived four houses down and still does. A great pianist and a great piano teacher. That’s probably where Doug got the beginning of his chops. His brother Al, also a good friend of mine, was a music engineer. Doug wanted some head shots done and I said OK, how about about  in a week or two? He said, he needed them done today.

So I reset the lights in the studio, broke out some Kodachrome and told him to get a couple changes of clothes and come back in two hours, which he did. In my opinion Doug was a multi-layered person. On stage he was an absolute dynamo. He could play with the best of them, and he did. He was Billy Joel’s bass guitar player for a long time with world-renowned drummer, Liberty Devitto, they grew up together. It’s amazing how music and photography go together. Way before MTV, Hullabaloo, Soul Train and the Dick Clark Show, music and images were always married together. Think of Al Jolson in The Jazz Singer. At the end of the shoot, I broke open a bottle of white wine and he handed me a list of people he wanted the photographs to go to. Which, to be honest, seemed a little odd at the time. But in reality, none of that’s important. Off stage, he was an extremely warm, gentle, loving person. Put him in the studio and his eyes lit up. One day he gave me a lecture on microphones. Yes, it was a little above my head.

To get to Doug’s studio we passed what seemed like an infinite number of gold records. To be honest, there may have been a lot more sides of Doug than I ever knew. He spent a lot of time on the road. And the road for both photographers and musicians can be kind, exciting and sometimes very cruel. Doug’s brother Al called me the other day and asked me if I had any photos of his brother. I said, yes but they’re buried in the archives of over a million still images between JoAnne and myself. He asked me if I’d take a look and I said…OK…but it’s going to take a month. What never ceases to amaze me is JoAnne’s grasp of not only her photography but her editing and skills in organization. She managed to find them in less than 2 hours. I’d like to share a few with you. Just three different sides of a very complicated, brilliant and amazing individual; who unfortunately moved on to another level of consciousness too early.

Tech Info: NikonF, 105mm lens, Kodachrome 64, 1/90th of a second at 5.6, mixed light (daylight and dynalight), Black and White converted in NIKs software

I’ll follow this up in a couple of months when I get through the artwork.

WALK IN PEACE

All the best,

Joe D

You can now follow me on Twitter @dimaggio_photo
Visual Impressions with Joe DiMaggio, Sponsored by Adorama
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