Photographer/Photo Editor – John Dominis Rest in Peace

John Dominis

John Dominis

To All The Ships At Sea

On more than one occasion I’ve made an announcement on the loss of a very special human being. As a young man I wrote a letter to John Dominis, staff photographer at LIFE Magazine and much to my surprise I received a beautiful letter back and phone call. Like all great talented people, most of them are genuinely humble. John was the epitome of this.

It was several years before we had an opportunity to meet in person and nothing changed. Still one of the greatest photographers of our time and a helluva great person. I guess I’ve learned to celebrate someone’s life and not go into a morbid funk about their loss. Having said that, I will share a story with you. John Dominis turned out to be my Photo Editor at Sports Illustrated.  When he took over he called me into his office and asked me what lens I used which was a total shock. When I told him it was a 16mm Nikkor (or was it a 15mm Nikkor I don’t remember?) He told me never to use a full frame fisheye on an S.I. assignment again or I will hear the words – you’ll never work for this book again. That was a side of John I had never seen before – stern, to the point and no bull – his way or the highway. About a year later, he gave me an assignment which may have been the longest assignment I had ever had at S.I. It was in excess of 3 weeks and covered 8 states from Ft. Lauderdale, FL to SaltLake City Utah, Reno Nevada, with a stop in Atlanta, Georgia and I forgot where else. I was doing a story on the Wittington Brothers who had just won Le Mans and were in the process of breaking the speed record in a WWII P51 Mustang. After three or four days of delays Bill Wittington, also known as the Wildman, said, “okay let’s go now.” I sat in the back of the P51 where the radio used to be. He said there was room for me, one camera, one lens, and some film.  He also suggested I take an ID in case we crash. I looked at my assistant and said give me the F2 with the widest lens we have. He handed it to me and the next thing I knew we were at 900 feet doing a snap roll  (it got my attention.) It was not lost on me that I had the full frame fisheye which if you bend off it’s axis it will just look like a super wide angle lens.  When the assignment was over, I turned in all my film and heard nothing. It was a future bonus piece so there was no deadline per se. A few months later about 1 AM the phone rang and John Dominis was on the line. He said, “I just wanted to tell you I just edited your Wittington Story and it’s one of the finest stories to go past my desk. You did one hell of a great job and I did not want to wait to tell you. By the way, what lens did you use in the cockpit?”  I said, “John I think it was an 18mm.” Dominis said, “I helped design that lens and that was no 18mm. Didn’t I tell you not to use that lens? It worked for this but don’t ever use it again.”  That’s my story.

If you want to see a some really fine photography check out John Dominis’ work.  He’s right there with W. Gene Smith, Alfred Eisenstadt, Carl Mydans and one of the all time greats.

© John Dominis

© John Dominis

© Joe DiMaggio
© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

 

Everything in Photography is a Compromise By Joe DiMaggio Sponsored by WD

Every once in a while the Moon and the stars align and life is good. Over the past twelve years I’ve been using WD exclusively for our studio, gallery, learning center – you get the idea. ABSOLUTELY! You are cordially invited to join me on December 11th at the B & H event space as a good time shall be had by all. To all the ships at sea, see you there.

Register for the event!

Speakers: Joe DiMaggio
Event Type: Photography, Video
Skill Level: Basic, Intermediate, Advanced
Location: B&H Event Space
Photographers are creating more and more images and managing your archive so that all the images you create are secure and easily located is essential to the professional photographer. This task is of paramount importance and there are tools that can be of great benefit to the photographer/videographer but on the other hand, many creative’s can find this part of workflow daunting and potentially disastrous. In this seminar we will concentrate on the benefits and show you how to avoid the disasters while providing inspiration from Joe DiMaggio’s work.Joe DiMaggio, a lifelong photographer with an illustrious career shooting; sports, environmental portraits, stock, video content, photo illustrations as well as fine art depends on his vast archive to survive and thrive.  This seminar sponsored by WD, a leader in digital storage and hard drives, will highlight Joe’s work and show you in a honest and straightforward way how to manage a state of the art workflow. While professionals will walk away with sound advice and archiving tips, this presentation will also be of benefit to amateur photographers who are concerned with saving the precious moments of their family history.WD will have a product expert on hand to show off new features on their current drives as well as field the most difficult of questions.
Joe DiMaggioJoe DiMaggio is an internationally known photographer who’s been making award winning photographs for four decades. His dynamic photographs have appeared in Time/Life, Sports Illustrated, Time Magazine, HBO and the list goes on. One of his Sports Illustrated covers was selected by Time Magazine as Picture of the Year.  DiMaggio made the obvious transition to advertising work for fortune 500 companies and was extremely sucessful doing photo illustrations for companies such as AT&T, AOL, Barclays, Xerox, Computer Associates, HBO, RJR Nabisco, Sony, Verizon, and Ford Motor Company. DiMaggio has contributed as an international pool photographer, to several Olympic Games. During his illustrious career DiMaggio’s done radio talk shows, television shows, magazine articles, and lectured at some of the most prestigious colleges and universities throughout the world.DiMaggio has been part of the American Photo Popular Photography Mentor Series. He’s hosted several ABC’s World of Photography television shows and hosted numerous Canon Photo Safaris. He’s hosted Internet TV’s Visual Impressions television show and completed numerous episodes showcasing his skill as a world renowned photographerRecently, Sports Illustrated selected one of DiMaggio’s photos as one of the third greatest photos in the last 100 years of the Indianapolis 500.visit Joe’s website to learn more. 

Everything in Photography is a Compromise By Joe DiMaggio Sponsored by WD

Every once in a while the Moon and the stars align and life is good. Over the last twelve years I’ve been using WD exclusively for my studio, gallery, learning center, office (you get the idea). ABSOLUTELY! You are cordially invited to join me on December 11th at the B & H event space and a good time shall be had by all. To all the ships at sea, see you there.

Register for the event!

Speakers: Joe DiMaggio
Event Type: Photography, Video
Skill Level: Basic, Intermediate, Advanced
Location: B&H Event Space
Photographers are creating more and more images and managing your archive so that all the images you create are secure and easily located is essential to the professional photographer. This task is of paramount importance and there are tools that can be of great benefit to the photographer/videographer but on the other hand, many creative’s can find this part of workflow daunting and potentially disastrous. In this seminar we will concentrate on the benefits and show you how to avoid the disasters while providing inspiration from Joe DiMaggio’s work.Joe DiMaggio, a lifelong photographer with an illustrious career shooting; sports, environmental portraits, stock, video content, photo illustrations as well as fine art depends on his vast archive to survive and thrive.  This seminar sponsored by WD, a leader in digital storage and hard drives, will highlight Joe’s work and show you in a honest and straightforward way how to manage a state of the art workflow. While professionals will walk away with sound advice and archiving tips, this presentation will also be of benefit to amateur photographers who are concerned with saving the precious moments of their family history.

WD will have a product expert on hand to show off new features on their current drives as well as field the most difficult of questions.

Joe DiMaggioJoe DiMaggio is an internationally known photographer who’s been making award winning photographs for four decades. His dynamic photographs have appeared in Time/Life, Sports Illustrated, Time Magazine, HBO and the list goes on. One of his Sports Illustrated covers was selected by Time Magazine as Picture of the Year.  DiMaggio made the obvious transition to advertising work for fortune 500 companies and was extremely sucessful doing photo illustrations for companies such as AT&T, AOL, Barclays, Xerox, Computer Associates, HBO, RJR Nabisco, Sony, Verizon, and Ford Motor Company. DiMaggio has contributed as an international pool photographer, to several Olympic Games. During his illustrious career DiMaggio’s done radio talk shows, television shows, magazine articles, and lectured at some of the most prestigious colleges and universities throughout the world.

DiMaggio has been part of the American Photo Popular Photography Mentor Series. He’s hosted several ABC’s World of Photography television shows and hosted numerous Canon Photo Safaris. He’s hosted Internet TV’s Visual Impressions television show and completed numerous episodes showcasing his skill as a world renowned photographer

Recently, Sports Illustrated selected one of DiMaggio’s photos as one of the third greatest photos in the last 100 years of the Indianapolis 500.

visit Joe’s website to learn more.

Throwback Thursday: It’s All Good

Hi to All the Ships at Sea,
Let’s see if I got this right-I don’t like Photoshop, right? Right. I don’t like software where you can manipulate images…right? Right. I believe everything should be done in the camera…right? Right. Never crop, right? Right. Less is more, right? Right. Digital will be just like 8-tracks, it’ll never last. So let’s check out the reality, I guess it’s impossible to be right all the time.

The photograph of this young lady catching a cod-fish off the coast of Prince Edward Island, up until today, was flat, muddy, indistinguishable and almost two stops under. There’s a technical term in photography for a photo like this…it’s blank blank blank blank. Well through a little bit of work in Photoshop and NIK software it came alive. The young lady’s name is JoAnne Kalish.

All the Best,

Joe D

 

Photography is Magic

NL - April13-1

© Ann Raine

To all the ships at sea,

On one level, if photography is magic then Ann Raine was Houdini. She put forth an unbelievable effort in everything that she did, and she reinvented herself on at least five occasions. We had very long discussions on where she wanted to go photographically, and in many ways I encouraged her with all my heart and soul. That was on the right hand; on the left hand I explained to her that the overall perception of photography was losing some of its magical powers. With the advent of digital, the image became a little too easy and a little too common. Having said that, the cream always comes to the top, and Ann was on the top and in many ways still is. Both JoAnne and I think of her all the time. There’s no doubt that she’s no longer in this consciousness but she has progressed and moved on to a finer one. Her great work will always be here; it will be archival in the truest sense of the word and last to infinity. The next time I see you, you are going to have to lead me on your workshop.

Please see the beautiful tribute from Warren Rosenberg.

To all the ships at sea, health and happiness

Joe DiMaggio

NL - April13-2

Indy 500

Hi to All the Ships at Sea,

The tulips are coming up, seems like the snow is almost gone and the Indy cars are starting to run. Remember what I said, one camera, one lens, all the time. Here’s a shot from the old days with one of my assistants. Count the cameras. Thank god for assistants. Would hate to be looking at his MRI today. On a recent Formula One, which in many ways is much more difficult than the Indy 500, I used 2 cameras and 2 lenses. Two Canon 5D Mark III, one 80mm-200  f/2.8 zoom and a second 5D Mark III with grip and 400mm f/5.6 and carrying a 1.4 extender. Gitso Monopod and 6 lexar cards, 8 gigs up to 32 gigs  Simple. Keep it simple. The photograph on the bottom was named by Sports Illustrated as the third best photograph of all time of the last 100 years.

All the Best,

Joe D

You can now follow me on Twitter @dimaggio_photo                                                                                                                                                              © Joe DiMaggio
Visual Impressions with Joe DiMaggio, Sponsored by Adorama
www.adorama.com
Adorama Learning Center

Love Gitso, Love Manfrotto, Love Walls

Hi to all the Ships at Sea,

Jeff Cable is an exceptionally fine photographer, and to say the least he is well traveled. Check him out and enjoy his blog below-he’s a good dude. You can follow his blog at http://jeffcable.blogspot.com.

All the best,

Joe D

Las Vegas – The Strip at Night
Last Friday, I returned from the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, Nevada. Most of my daylight hours were spent either presenting or in meetings, but I still managed to get out for a couple of night shoots along the famous Las Vegas strip.

On my first night in town, I met up with my good friend, Matt Sweetwood (who is the President of Unique Photo in New Jersey) and we had an awesome dinner. What is the best way to work off dinner? Take a walk around and shoot some photos, of course! (Photographer’s note: I shot this photo with a 6 second exposure to create the light trails from the cars. I timed this exposure so that the cars were turning towards me. I found that the curved lines were more appealing than straight lines. Since I was not planning on shooting at this time, I did not have my tripod with me. I set my camera on a nearby wall and used the 2 second timer on the camera to avoid any camera shake.

To Shop or Not to Shop

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

I’ve had an opportunity to spend ten years at the University of Arizona doing workshops and lectures, and in the day shooting some assignments and stock work. Funny how it all seemed to come around in January and February hmm…, first thing  when I got to Tucson, would be I’d hire one or two assistants and interns. One of the best was Lee Ann Fox, extremely bright, creative and a lot of fun. As the sun was setting, I came up with a photo of Lee Ann her (nickname was the Fox) on her motorcycle. If you look closely at the bottom photograph you will see a hell of a lot of industrial stuff. In the day before Photoshop I would attempt to do a multiple exposure, shoot the background separate, another at speed, and then I’d have an assistant photoshop it. Camera 35mm, lens 35mm f/1.4, the platform was a moving rent-a-car,1/60 of a second, at f/5.6, ISO 50. If you look close, you will see me in Fox’s mirror. Photo tip of the day,is to make sure you have a great driver and a model that can take direction by hand motions. Do not try this while driving the car, it could be dangerous.

Kayaking with Murphy

Photo ©Joe DiMaggio

You would think after several decades of making photographs there would be no surprises, but the greatest thing about photography is that there’s always a surprise. You can pre plan everything to the final millimeter, you can pick the perfect day for light, you can have the best athletes or models, but invariably something will come up and will bite you on the –whatever. This is a perfect example, of Murphy rearing his ugly head. We planned this shoot several months ago waiting for the right rain conditions so we could make great photographs on the upper portions of the Raymondskill Creek. Cue the cameras! Cue the kayakers, let’s go! But Murphy cued three logs that broke loose and were blocking the creek. Ya can’t kayak over a log, and you can’t kayak through a log, so we went to plan B. Plan B was a 44 foot drop. To put that into perspective, that s a 4 story building straight down. The problem with the shot is the extreme heavy mist. It was like putting a Tupperware cap over your lens. The front element of the lens was absolutely soaking wet all the time and as we all know, anything put in front of a lens will degrade the image. I was shooting with the Sigma 150-500 and I didn’t have the underwater version- OK that’s me trying to be funny again. One of the keys in photography is your ability to be flexible, when you don’t get what you want- you gotta get something. We hiked up one more mile to a tributary and were able to get a 30 foot drop shot with the 24-70 Sigma. ISO and exposure are approximately the same; the difference would be considerably less mist. Keep on shooting, it’s all good. Next time I see you- I’ll have a brand new set of wheels- half titanium and half ceramic.

Joe D

 

Photos ©Joe DiMaggio

TIME Magazine Assignment


I had a half hour off the other day. Decided to just look through some of my old TIME magazine and Sports Illustrated assignments and I stumbled across this photo that I did for them to celebrate the opening of Giant Stadium. I was totally blown away when I heard they were going to build a new stadium. It seems like yesterday they just built a new stadium. Of course, a businessman friend of mine explained that it’s all about the super boxes and the Fortune 500. Well, considering my only interest is between the goal line and the goal line, a super box just doesn’t do it for me. If TIME asks me to go and shoot the new one, it’s gonna take me a little longer to get to the birds’ eye perch.  See you at the game!

Joe D.