Alan Kaplan vs Peter B. Kaplan

© Joe DiMaggio

To All the Ships at Sea,

For whatever reason photographers rarely get together and socialize with each other.  Wow, what a shame that is.  Alan Kaplan, an internationally known photographer has been our neighbor for about 15 years. Only recently did we get together to break bread.  I’m only sorry we didn’t do this sooner. Alan’s wife Wendy is an international producer of films and a world class model.  Everybody knows my partner JoAnne and as Bill Shatner would say “also one of the finest photographers in the United States.”  Our lunch was wonderful as well as the conversation. Alan is one of the few intellectual photographers.  He’s not a button pusher he puts a whole lot of thought into his photography and his place on the planet.  Wendy is diametrically opposite – she’s a very quiet woman of few words, totally laid back, with no particular positions on politics, the human condition, or most matters.  NOT!  Wendy is very outspoken and dynamic. Don’t get on her bad side because she’s a tough broad which is a good thing!  Alan’s studio was one floor apart from my friend Peter B. Kaplan’s -another world class photographer and also was next to the artist who put the capital © in copyright but that’s separate blog.  That evening the four of us continued onto Malibu ranch to photograph a rodeo and had a great time which was   followed by a late night dinner at the Fauchére.  It doesn’t get better than that.

In a month or so Alan will be having a show on Ethiopia at Lenox Hill Hospital.

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

 

Rodeo, the Only Ones Hurt are usually the Contestants not the animals!

©Joe Di Maggio

©Joe Di Maggio

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To all the ships at sea,

I remember the first time I heard the expression, “It’s not my first rodeo.”  Well a few years ago, when I shot my first rodeo, I told the head Wrangler, “This is my first rodeo,” he thought that was pretty funny.  I will share this with you, I am totally petrified of horses.  The same way I’m petrified of skiing.  When I was 16 years old, never on skis, I was taken to the top of Terry Peak South Dakota Mountain, and put on the solid ice expert trail.  About an hour later, bruised, battered, and bleeding, I walked into the Chalet… get the idea?  Same year, two friends took me horseback riding, sneakers, no socks.  Some people just never learn.  I think I still have the scars on my ankles.  Galloping before I could walk, maybe that’s my life story.

©Joe Di Maggio

©Joe Di Maggio

For our rodeo on Saturday, we had light rain.  I love shooting in the rain, whether it’s in Manhattan, Big Sur, or a Rodeo.  It really adds another dimension, a forth dimension, very very cool.  Basic rule of thumb; much higher ISO.  It was almost the longest day of the year, but 7:00 it was 0 dark thirty.  I kicked my ISO up to 3200, shot with my 200 mm f/1.8 (which looks like it went through Afghanistan twice, but it’s sharp as a tack), paired it with a 5d Mark lll, which is a well sealed camera,  and tried to keep my shutter speed up to 1/1500 at f/2.0.  You can see the results below, very shallow depth of field, but stopped the action quite well.  I very rarely shoot on continuous, but with rodeo, I make an exception.  Traditionally I shoot a lot of verticals, in rodeo, a lot of horizontals.  Bagged the camera (hermetically sealed with a white garbage bag).  My team members had a great time, everybody had a great time, and thank God none of the cowboys got hurt, and all of the animals were fine as well.  Life is good.  As my friend Willie Nelson would say, “I’ll see you on the road again.”

On July 18th.  See link below.

Next Rodeo

©Joe Di Maggio

©Joe Di Maggio

©Joe Di Maggio

©Joe Di Maggio

 

_D6C6477 copy

©Joe Di Maggio

 

_D6C6635 copy

©Joe Di Maggio

©Joe Di Maggio

©Joe Di Maggio

 

A Great Photo By Barbara

© Barbara Lawrence

Over the weekend I had the pleasure of taking a small, elite group of photographers to the rodeo for a sports and action workshop, which always involves environmental portraits. It started in the learning center, and after an hour of multimedia shows we went off to the ranch, and the weather was gorgeous. Then along came Murphy. The rain was so hard, they postponed the event by an hour and 15 minutes. While students were hiding in my automobile, I decided to put them in one of the barns. Barbara made this wonderful photograph while waiting for the rain to stop. For me, watching another photographer constantly looking and communicating with, in this case the cowboys, the wranglers, the owners, etc, is great. And the icing on the cake is one fine photograph.  Here’s an email that I received from Barbara;

“I had a great time and also have many dreadful images. Interesting how the color of the light changed as the riders moved around the ring.

I think that my favorite was the man in the barn doorway. I have several with wonderful light. These are almost untouched, except for black and white in Lightroom”

Dynalite Makes Its Own Light

© Peter Poremba

To all the ships at sea, if there’s one thing I’ve learned in my years as a photographer and  filmmaker, it’s that I don’t have all the answers. Hopefully, I’m smart enough to go to the people that do have the answers. Peter Poremba, the CEO, president, and senior electrical engineer of Dynalite was kind enough to go to Malibu on two separate occasions, and with the minimum amount of equipment he was able to light 30% of the arena: just one light and one power pack (if it was for SI, he would have brought in six power packs and eight lights). The combination of the electronic flash and the hypersync on my Canon 7D and Peter’s Nikon D7000 made for some photos that could not be taken back in the day. Some of the other photos in this blog I threw in just because I wanted to, will have a follow up.

Tech information: triggering device was the new Pocket Wizard Flex, power pack MP800, SH2000 Studio Head, SP-45 reflector, Nikon 85mm 1.4 lens, Canon 135mm lens.

Nikon D7000 exposures: 1/800 of a second, ISO 400, f4

Canon 7D exposures: 1/1200 of a second, ISO 500, f4.5

Peter Poremba, © Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio, no strobe

© Joe DiMaggio

My Second Rodeo

To all the ships at Sea

I was so blown away by the rodeo experience that I decided to go back and shoot some video. My camera of choice was the Canon 5D Mark III with a Zacuto finder,a Manfrotto video monopod, and a 24-105mm Canon lens. We mounted the new GoPro HD2 on the bullfighter, for a view which I call from the inside out, rather than the outside in. The footage can now be viewed below, please take a look; there are some amazing images there. Can’t wait for my third Rodeo

Joe D

[vimeo 45714998]

Video © 2012 Joe DiMaggio

Not My First Rodeo

To All The Ships At Sea

One of the great advantages of being a photographer is travel. I’ve been blessed because over my career I’ve been around the world twice and am now working on the third time. Many of my assignments revolved around sports and action. With all the assignments and travel, I had never photographed a rodeo until last week.It was my first. While shooting, an official came over and was kind enough to give me insight on who, what, and where the action would be taking place and for how long. I looked at him and said you do understand this is not my first rodeo and then realized what I had said and immediately corrected myself. Utilizing this cowboy’s thirty years of doing rodeo helped me make a better photograph with less mistakes.  This is what I call important pre-production. I make it my business to  seek out the elder of the village whether it’s in Botswana, Palermo or Utah. Do your research and seek out whatever help you can get to make your work better. Keeping your mind open to learn and trying knew things is important and it’s what makes the world go round.  The DiMaggio/Kalish Learning Center will be doing two professional rodeo workshops this year and they will be awesome.

Rodeo

©2012 Joe DiMaggio

All Photos ©2012 Joe DiMaggio

©’12 Joe DiMaggio

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©’12 Joe DiMaggio

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©’12 Joe DiMaggio

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©’12 Joe DiMaggio