Win Number Two for Boxer Khalid Twaiti

To All the Ships At Sea –

Most of you know I have been photographing boxing for a long time.  I also have been working on a film titled IN THIS CORNER and it has been one of my ongoing projects.  Over the years, I have photographed Mohammed Ali, Joe Frazier, Mike Tyson, Sugar Ray Leonard, Marvin Hagler, Arturo Gatti, Gerry Cooney, Larry Holmes, and the list goes on.

While working on my film at Gleason’s I met a young man by the name of Khalid Twaiti over a decade ago. I believe he was 10 or 11 years old at the time.  He had fire in his eyes, passion in his soul and determination in his heart. He is also very bright young man.  Khalid has ten years at Gleason’s with an amazing amateur record.  He has a great trainer by the name of Don Saxby who also has the same passion dedication and heart. Not only is he a great trainer but a surrogate dad in and out of the ring. Khalid’s mom, dad, family, and friends are very much behind him. Put that all in the world’s largest blender and what comes out I believe to be the next lightweight champion of the world –  somewhere maybe between 118 and 127. Khalid will probably need another 36-40 months but will become Champion. There is no doubt in my mind.

Please enjoy the short video and stills from his recent fight in Brooklyn. https://vimeo.com/233877446

Please consider purchasing my book FILL THE FRAME “Recalling My Adventures as a Working Photographer from the 60’s to present day. The book describes his career working for publications such as SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, TIME MAGAZINE, HBO, rapidly followed by a brilliant career in Corporate and Advertising.  It’s also about how photography has evolved over the years.” FILL THE FRAME goes into detail about the many people I have photographed – celebrities, sports figures as well as so many others and his experiences working with them, and the stories behind the photographs.

Book is $20 plus $4 shipping. You can pay by check, paypal or credit card (through Paypal.)  

FILL THE FRAME Hit Thirteen

To All the Ships at Sea,

In a world moving at light speed, yes I’ve used this saying before…  To have 4 consecutive great days is almost unheard of.  Well, I’ve had 5 great days.  It started out good and ended fabulous.  My book FILL THE FRAME hit 13 on Amazon. Sean Strub of the hotel Fauchére hosted a book signing for literary club which was extremely successful.  The one hour presentation lasted 2 hours.  I was totally honored that people came to hear me and purchase a copy of my book.  I guess I will have to start working on FILL THE FRAME II.

Excerpts from my book FILL THE FRAME…

© Joe DiMaggio

I wanted Star Trek’s William Shatner as a celebrity guest & co-host when I was hosting The Canon Photo Safari. We finally connected in 1999, for a segment being filmed in Israel. I didn’t know much about him; I was no Trekkie, but for some reason Bill had always fascinated me.

One typically torrid morning at 4:30, we set off for some far-flung location, and by 3:30 that afternoon it was even hotter. Bill and I were sitting shoulder to shoulder on a stone wall, gazing out at a magnificent ruin, when he glanced at me and said, “You know Joe, you look really hot.”

“Well, it’s warm,” I said, “but I’m not that hot.”

“Well, you really look really hot.”

“What can I say? It’s hot.””

“You know what? You also look very, very tired.”

“Well, I’m not that tired.”

“But you really look tired. You look very hot, and you look very tired. Actually, you look exhausted.”
“I’m really not exhausted.” “No, you really are exhausted.”

At that point, we paused. I’m not the sharpest knife in the drawer, sometimes it takes two or three kicks under the table for me to catch on. I looked at the director, and said, “I’m feeling a little queasy, I’m very hot, and I’m really tired. I’d like to go back to the kibbutz, and relax a bit. Is there any way we could make up the work tomorrow?”

The director said, “Well, if you’re not up to it . . .”

©Joe DiMaggio

    © Joe DiMaggio

 

 

IN THIS CORNER!

To All the Ships at Sea,

All Photos © Joe DiMaggio

Many of you know that I set out to do a 10 minute video on boxing at Gleason’s Gym about 10-12 years ago. The concept was JoAnne ringside talking about her experiences photographing boxing as a woman, in a man’s sport with a woman’s viewpoint, in at the time a male photographic oriented business.

Well that day turned into the beginning of a long film called In This Corner and it’s been an on-going project ever since. It’s out of pure passion and love for the sport (you also have to know, that I have a love hate relationship with boxing as there are many bad sides of boxing.) Every once in a while you’ll come across a few boxers who make it but the majority of these boxers never actually get from point A to point B.  I had an opportunity to photograph the Terrance Crawford vs. Felix Diaz fight two weeks ago. I made a decision to give up my credentials for the the fight after driving thirteen hours to North Carolina to photograph one of the brightest young boxers by the name of Khalid, one of the protagonists in my film. We worked a 14 hour day and the last fight was supposed to go off at 10 PM but actually started at 12:30AM. We started at 10 in the morning, so by that time, we were seriously dragging ass and one of the corner workers – in  Mr. so-and-so’s corner took objections to our photography position after shooting what 17 fights?  I made a decision that if you have nothing else to do but give us a hard time after just trying to do our job, we’re leaving so we left.  You know what happened?  They got no national exposure because when the digital images were turned into Zuma Press there were no photos of their number one fighter so no publicity. Oh well… I guess that’s the way it goes….

Today Was A Catch-28!

To All the Ships At Sea –

Pretty sure most of you read Joseph Heller’s book CATCH-22.  Well today I had a Catch-28!  Called Amazon and explained my name was spelled wrong in my Amazon book listing and the publisher’s name was wrong.  They said no problem…please hold.  I was on hold for four minutes and decided I should water my basil…which I did…still on hold. With that Peter Poremba, the CEO of Dynalite called and I abruptly told him, I’d call him back.  Seven minutes into my hold,  Al Stegmeyer from Upstrap called. I also blew him off.  Their music was starting to drive me crazy so I decided to go brush my teeth.  Still waiting… I gargled.  We are now 12 minutes into the hold and I figured well… I’m in the bathroom…. Now 15 minutes into it, I decided to take a quick shower. I quickly, jumped out of the tub and wrapped a towel around me and my friend Sam Garcia called.  Also blew him off and said I’d get back.  Went outside, still waiting, I watered my tomatoes, and went back into the studio. With that JoAnne asked me where I had been?  I simply said I’ve been on hold.  Twenty four minutes later, the lovely lady told me there was nothing they could do about it and to call the Publisher and tell them to make the changes.  She said it would probably take till July to implement them.  The first line in my new book FILL THE FRAME  is six months ago, I was 20 years old.  That’s how fast life is…light speed plus.  Time is like gold – more valuable than material things.

If you want to read a great book (FILL THE FRAME) – see reviews.    Attached link to short video – http://FILL THE FRAME https://vimeo.com/220041332

Live, Love, Laugh & be Happy – hold on a minute I will get back to you.  film is 28 seconds… time is very valuable…

There’s No Crying in Baseball

To All the Ships At Sea

Every once in a while I think I can write.  At least my English professor the first year in college thought I could. I’m pretty sure it’s the only A I’ve gotten (well maybe also in history.)  Then along comes Mark Joseph, one hell of a great writer says the New York Times for sure.  He was on the best seller list.  The man loves baseball!   I’d like to share this piece he sent me the other day.

 

author-mark-joseph-sept_17_2016_043Beisbol

Adiós Pelota
Baseball withdrawal has been easier than ever this year. After the worst World Series in living memory, I’m scratching my head and wondering how the postseason fizzled. Every single one of my predictions was wrong, which is nothing new, but who could have predicted five errors by Detroit pitchers in five games to hand the series to the worst team ever to win the big banana. The poor TV ratings reflected the low quality of play in damn near freezing weather, and all I can say in favor of St. Louis is that they still have the best uniforms in the National League when they wear red hats and home whites. Why the Cards sometimes wear blue hats is beyond me. I’d like to see the Cards play the Nippon Ham Fighters who won the Japanese World Series. The Yankees and Mets, who could have staged a terrific subway series, both went bust because of injuries and lack of pitching, and the Twins finally ran out of gas. The result: zilch, double zilch and a bullshit pine tar controversy. Egad, what’s a fan to do? Winter ball. Mexico

On Saturday night, October 21, I saw the Venados – the Bucks – of Mazatlán play at home against Los Yaquis of Ciudad Obregón. In a beautiful little stadium jammed to overflowing with 14,000 fans, Mazatlán won 2-1 in a tight, errorless ball game that featured three outrageous calls by the umpires that favored the home team. My friend Larry Banner who lives in Mazatlán bought field level seats ($9) that put us next to the home dugout and behind a chain-link fence within spitting distance of first base. A Yaqui runner beat the throw by a step and the ump called him out. Another Yaqui runner was picked off and was clearly safe, but the ump called him out. And when a Mazatlán runner dashed home on a hit to the outfield, the beautiful throw from right field had him nailed but he was called safe. The visiting manager didn’t make a peep, leaving me to believe that everybody understood that when Mazatlán visits Obregón the calls would favor the home team there.

Mazatlán is an extraordinarily polite city, and the fans were enthusiastic but not rowdy. Noisy, yes, insane, no, considering that before the game guys in yellow vests put buckets of ice and beer every few steps up the aisles in the stands. The Pacifico Brewery, which seems to own Mazatlán, owns the team, and perhaps the league, and you could get a beer by waving your hand, but you had to go to the concessions for a Coke. The baseball was AA at best, maybe good college ball, and no one on the field stood out as a major league talent. Each team in the Mexican Pacific Coast League is allowed 5 foreign players, although the Bucks have 6 (5 gringos and 1 Dominican) and if you wonder why a 32 year old American is playing for Mazatlán, maybe you should watch the film Major League again. The fans didn’t care. The uniforms said Mazatlán – and Pacifico and Señor Frogs and Coca-Cola and Bancomer and Mega, so much advertising they looked like soccer uniforms – but the best part was the end of the game when 2000 kids ran onto the field. The players hung around and signed autographs for 30 minutes until the lights went out to get everyone off the field. This was pure bush-league baseball in a bush-league town, a little time capsule with no million-dollar contracts, no hissy fits, no posturing, and no bullshit except for the umpires, at least on this night, when time stopped and it was 1953 again.

Mark Joseph is an American novelist. He is the author of To Kill the Potemkin, originally published in 1986. As a paperback, it spent four weeks on The New York Times bestseller list in July and August 1987.

He later published the novels Mexico 21 (1990), Typhoon (1991), Deadline Y2K (1999), and The Wild Card (2011).

Born in 1946 in Vallejo, California, he is a 1967 graduate of the University of California, Berkeley.

A.J. Foyt: Four Time Winner of the Indy 500

aj foyt B&W

© Joe DiMaggio

To all the ships at sea,

I’ve had the privilege of shooting the Indy 500 twenty plus years in a row. I missed a few years, went back and did three more.  I vowed the next one would be the 100th anniversary. Well, I’M NOT DOING IT!  Why? It’s not the priority it used to be. I hope it’s a great, safe race, and hope there’s a new winner. Here are a few snaps of the great A.J. Foyt. The photo of A.J. hitting the linkage was during the third pit stop where his crew could not free the shifting linkage. The sight of A.J. coming down the pits, pulling his seat belt, and helmet off, and jumping out of the car while it was still rolling absolutely horrified me. I don’t think you could do that today, but I love the photograph.

@ Joe DiMaggio

@ Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

© Joe DiMaggio

The Closest Finish, circa 1982.

Hockey’s Greatest Photos

 

©Bruce Bennett

©Bruce Bennett

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

©Bruce Bennett

©Bruce Bennett

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To all the ships at sea,

Honesty is the best policy.  Most photographers can range from good, to mediocre, to fine, to great, to super.  Regardless of whether they’re an amateur, a pro, an advanced whatever, they all seem to have one thing in common, they aren’t good businessmen.  Neil Leifer, Jay Mizell, Pete Turner, great photographers, great businessmen.  Which leads me to a book with a very modest name, Hockey’s Greatest Photos, by Bruce Bennett.  Before seeing the book, and just hearing the name, I think I said four wow’s.  The book arrived on my doorstep today, and you know what, they may not be all the greatest hockey photos, but there’s a whole lot of great photos in this book.  If you’re a hockey aficionado, if you’re a hockey player, if you’re from Canada, Boston New York, anywhere theres an NHL team, you must own this book.  Bruce, are you really going to give me $2 a  book for endorsement?  That’s me trying to be funny.  If anyone knows Bruce, he’s not giving anyone any money, that’s also me trying to be funny.  Bruce, I take my beret off to you.  Are you the same Bruce Bennett that use to assist me?  Hm… I wonder…  Well, I’ll leave you with this, there’s an old Italian saying, “Mazel Tov, You’re a real mensch.”

 

                                                           The Hockey News

                   Hockey’s Greatest Photos The Bruce Bennett Collection

                             Forewords by Wayne Gretzky & Martin Brodeur

The Hockey News’ latest book, Hockey’s Greatest Photos: The Bruce Bennett Collection, is the perfect pickup for the diehard hockey fan. As the “Wayne Gretzky of hockey photography,” Bruce Bennett is known as the best in the business, and he has put together the definitive collection of the game’s best photos from his 40-plus years shooting hockey.

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then Hockey’s Greatest Photos is a 250,000-word epic. In it, Bennett reveals 250 of his best photos taken from an archive that runs to more than two million images shot over his four decades in hockey. He captures it all: competition, camaraderie, iconic moments, amazing goals, sizzling saves, bone-crushing hits, and off-ice hilarity. He covers every emotion associated with the game, from the ecstasy of victory to the agony of defeat, and he does so from every conceivable angle. Whether on the ice, from the corner, in the stands, behind the bench, beside the penalty box, inside the net or in the dressing room, Hockey’s Greatest Photos immortalizes the essence of the game.

About The Photographer:

For 40 years Bruce Bennett has covered hockey. Bruce shot his first Stanley Cup final in Philadelphia in 1976 as the Montreal Canadiens defeated the Flyers. Since then, he has covered 35 Cup finals, 26 All-Star Games, more than 375 international games including four Winter Olympics, and more than 4,500 NHL games. In addition, Bruce has been the team photographer for several Stanley Cup winning teams including the New York Islanders, New Jersey Devils, and New York Rangers. Bruce’s company Bruce Bennett Studios (BBS) and its archive of two million hockey images was acquired by Getty Images in 2004, and Bruce joined the company as a staff photographer.

About the Book:

Hockey’s Greatest Photos: The Bruce Bennett Collection

By The Hockey News

Photographs by Bruce Bennett

Forewords by Wayne Gretzky & Martin Brodeur

On-sale October 6th, 2015

The Hockey News

ISBN: 9781988002125  $39.95 CAN $34.95 US

eBook ISBN: 9781476782522 $15.99 $12.99

For media inquiries or requests for promotional images please contact Katie.callaghan@simonandschuster.ca.

www.simonandschuster.ca

 

 

 

I think I used to shoot hockey in the day…

 

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe DiMaggio

©Joe DiMaggio

 

 

 

Indy 500 Month of May

10 Greatest Indy Moments Indy Finish © Joe DiMaggio

10 Greatest Indy Moments
Indy Finish © Joe DiMaggio

S.I. Indy Third Greatest Photograph in 100 years © DiMaggioIt’s the month of May, and the Month of May means the Indianapolis 500. Sports Illustrated, selected one of my photographs as the third greatest photographs in the last 100 years of the Indianapolis 500.  As we know Sports Illustrated, is the definitive expert on all things photographic and sports oriented. Now at this point, I have to take my humility and modesty, and for a few seconds and put them aside. Personally, I think it’s the best photograph in the last 100 years. Putting that photograph aside for a moment, let me share one of my favorite photographs of the Indianapolis 500.  In 19?? AJ Floyt passed the start-finish line (before the days of radio transmission) screaming at 185 miles per hour, waving his arms.  At the next lap he came into the pit  – there was no speed limit and he came in at 150mph and slammed on his brakes. He screamed at the top of his lungs that he only had two gears and his linkage was hung up!  There was nothing his crew could immediately do, so he got back in the car, went back on the track (while still screaming I add.) He made another lap, and came back in; only this time he took his belt off. By the time he hit the brake box, he had jumped out of his number 14 racer, removed his helmet (almost knocking me over), grabbed a hammer, and started to beat the linkage to death.  When he was satisfied, he put his helmet back on, & jumped back into his car.

A.J Foyt Indy © Joe DiMaggio

A.J Foyt Indy © Joe DiMaggio

Neil Leifer, One of a Kind

There’s no doubt that Neil Leifer is one of the all time great sports photographers.  I’m pretty sure he has at least half a million Sports Illustrated covers alone, and I think it’s fair to say that there aren’t any weak ones.  Neil came up with what I consider a great documentary on four photographers who have photographed every super bowl.  Photographers and filmmakers should have great hand-eye coordination and should always be in the right place at the right time.  Neil knows how to do that, but he goes one step further, he’s a visionary.  I would imagine hundreds of photographers would have said, “Wow, I wish I would have thought of that.”  He thought of that and made it happen.  His film is called Keepers of the Streak features the only four photographers in the world that have covered all 48 Super Bowls, starting from one in 1967 to 2014.  It stars Walter Iooss, Mickey Palmer, Tony Tomsic, and John Biever.

 

©NeilLeifer

©NeilLeifer

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